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March  19  SO 


International  Women's  Day: 

Wednesday,  March  5:  A  Special  Day  of  Programming. 
Saturday  &  Sunday,  March  8  &  9:  Women's  Films. 

A  Day  of  Celtic  Culture 

Monday,  March  17: 
Irish  Music  and  Arts. 

■'0- 


Transition  to  Solar:  Page  11. 
Quit  Smoking  with  KPFK:  Page  7 
Your  Letters:  Page  35. 


RPFR  90.7  fm 

Pacif  ica  Radio  •  Los  Angeles 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  2 


KPFK  STAFF 

General  Manager/ 
Acting  Program  Dir. 
Business  Manager 
Assistant  Manager/ 
Promotion 
Development  Dir. 
Music 


News 

Public  Affairs 

Cultural  Affairs 
Nite  Mag.,  Traffic 
Production 


Chief  Engineer 

Subscriber  Devel. 
Community  Events 
Folio  Editor 


Jim  Berland 
Beverly  Zeller 

Anita  Styles 
Michele  Taylor 
Carl  Stone,  Director 
John  Wager-Schneider 
Lois  Vierk 

Richard  Mahler,  Director 
Diana  Martinez,  Ass't.  Dir. 
Anita  Frankel,  Director 
Earl  Ofari 

Paul  Vangeiisti,  Director 
Roy  E.  Tuckman 
Linda  Mack,  Director 
Margaret  Fowler,  Manager 
Helene  Rosenbluth, 
Training  Coordinator 
Sylvester  Rivers 
Don  Wilson 
Lezlie  Lee,  Assistant 
Ahna  Armour,  Director 
Mario  Casetta,  Director 
Jane  Gordon 


KPFK  SWITCHBOARD:  213/877-2711 


KPFK  LOCAL  ADVISORY  BOARD 

David  Abcrson,  Dori  Aberson,  )acki  Addis,  Danny  Bakewell, 
Jack  Berman,  Mario  Casetta,  Mocte/uma  Espar^a,  David  Fin- 
kel,  Peter  Flaxman,  Ruth  Galanter,  Clifford  Getz,  Brownlee 
Haydon,  Linda  Hunt,  Wilma  Keller,  David  Levy,  Mel  Reich, 
lonas  Rosenfield  Jr.,  Leonard  Linger,  Delfino  Varela,  David 
Wesley. 

PACIFICA  FOUNDATION  NATIONAL  BOARD  OF 
DIRECTORS  AND  OFFICERS 

R.  Gordon  Agnew,  Hon.  Chair;  Jack  O'Dell,  Chair;  Peter  Tag- 
ger, President;  Victor  Honig,  Treas.;  Peter  Franck,  1st  V.P.; 
Marge  Glaser,  2nd  V.P.;  Ralph  Englenr-.n,  3rd  V.P.;  Greg  Lewis, 
Sec'y;  Delfino  Varela,  Ass't  Sec'y;  Steve  Berner,  Gabrielle 
Edgcomb,  Clifford  Getz,  Oscar  Hanigsberg,  Kenneth  Jenkins, 
David  Lampel,  Acklyn  Lynch,  Jean  Molyneaux,  William  Sokol, 
William  Swenson,  Alex  Vavoulis. 

PACIFICA  FOUNDATION  NATIONAL  STAFF 

Joel  Kugelmass,  Exec.  Director;  Mary  Simon,  Controller; 
Ron  Stone,  Admin.  Ass't.;  Mariana  Berkovich,  Bookkeeper 

PACIFrCA  NATIONAL  OFFICE 

5316  Venice  Blvd.,  Los  Angeles  CA  90019 
213/931-1625 

PACIFICA  NAT'L  NEWS  SERVICE;  WASHINGTON  NEWS 
BUREAU  (PATTI  NEIGHMOND,  ACTING  BUREAU  CHIEF) 

868  National  Press  Building,  Washington  DC  20045 
202/  628-4620 

PACIFICA  PROGRAM  SERVICE  &  TAPE  LIBRARY 
(HELEN  KENNEDY,  DIRECTOR) 

5316  Venice  Blvd.  L.A.  90019;  213/931-1625 

PACFICA  NETWORK  SISTER  STATIONS 

KPFA:  2207  Shattuck  Ave.,  Berkeley  CA  94704 
WBAI:  505  Eighth  Ave.,  New  York  NY  10018 
KPFT:  419  Lovett  Blvd.,  Houston  TX  77006 
WPFW:  700  H  St.  N.W.,  Washington  DC  20001 


The  KPFK  Local  Advisory  Board  meets  each  month  on  the  third  Tuesday,  7:30  p.m. 
at  the  station,  3729  Cahuenga  Blvd.  West,  North  Hollywood.  Members  of  the  public 
are  invited  to  attend  to  observe  the  functioning  of  the  Board. 


Volume  22,  Number  3.  March  1980 

(There  was  no  Vol.  22,  No.  2,  due  to  dividing  up  Jan.  Folio) 

The  Folio  is  a  monthly  publication  of  KPFK,  3729  Cahuenga  Blvd.  West,  North  Hollywood  CA  91604.  Application  to  mail  at  2nd 
Class  postage  rates  is  pending  at  No.  Hy  wd.  CA  and  additional  mailing  offices.  The  KPFK  Folio  is  not  sold.  It  is  sent  free  to  each 
subscriber  supporting  our  non-profit,  non-commercial  station,  and  contains  the  most  accurate  possible  listings  of  the  programs  we 
broadcast.  Subscriptions  are  $30  per  year  and  are  transferrable  to  the  other  Pacifica  stations.  Our  transmitter  is  on  Mt.  Wilson.  We 
broadcast  in  stereo  multiplex  with  25  microsecond  pre-emphasis.  Dolby  calibration  tones  air  daily,  before  the  principal  evening 
music  program.  Mailing  address:  PO  Box  8639,  Universal  City  CA  91608.  Phones:  213/  877-2711  and  984-2711.  KPFK  is  owned 
and  operated  by  the  Pacifica  Foundation,  a  non-profit  institution.  KPFK  is  a  member  of  the  Association  of  California  Public  Radio 
Stations  and  the  National  Federation  of  Community  Broadcasters. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  3 


THE  VOLUNTEERS 

They  turn  Ihc  station  on  and  off,  and  make  it  go  in  between.  They  run  errands,  produce  programs,  engineer,  stuff 
envelopes,  answer  phones,  build  things,  help  at  off-air  events — in  other  words,  wc  couldn't  exist  without  them. 
Those  not  listed  elsewhere  in  the  Folio  are: 


Bob  Aldrich 
J .  Alexander 
Marlene  Alvarado 
Richard  Amromin 
Art  Aratin 
Steve  Barker 
Horace  Beasley 
Richard  Berger 
Abbie  Bernstein 
Bruce  Bidlack 
John  Bliss 
Peggy  Blauer 
Pam  Boehnert 
Rene  Bohne 
Dubin  Burke 
Martin  Burton 
Lucia  Chappelle 
Louise  Chevlin 
BJ  Clark 
Jane  Clewe 
Peter  Cole 
Peter  Cutler 
Alex  Dymally 
Andrea  Enthal 
Laura  Ewig 
Mark  Farjean 
Larry  Faulks 


Joe  Feinblatt 
Marianne  Finkelstein 
Frances  Fischer 
Ronald  Fong 
Cecilia  Ford 
Scott  Fraser 
Kevin  Gallagher 
Leigh  Garner 
Matt  Gibson 
Kevin  Glenn 
Marcia  Golde 
Greg  Gordon 
Brian  Grant 
Ron  Grayson 
Gail  Valerie  Griffin 
Leigh  Haber 
Rick  Haley 
Nancy  Hamilton 
Bill  Handelsman 
Burt  Handelsman 
Virginia  Harvey 
Jeanne  Henley 
April  Hill 
Larry  Johnson 
Adrian  Jaspan 
Susan  J  udy 
Alan  Kanter 


Nick  Kawaguchi 
Michael  Kearns 
Jim  Kepner 
David  Kirk 
Tina  Kleinman 
Dave  Krebs 
Jay  Kugelman 
Chuck  Larson 
Chris  Lauterbach 
George  Ligeros 
Roger  Lighty 
Vander  Lockett 
Michael  Lombard! 
Tony  Lopez 
Elizabeth  Luye 
Iris  Mann 
Eva  Marcus 
Mike  Martinez 
Maureen  Mcllroy 
Lee  McLaren 
Michael  Miasnikov 
Joan  Midler 
Sam  Mittleman 
Leslie  Morrow 
Ralph  Neil 
Doug  Northrop 
Ina  Northrop 


Alex  Novakavitch 
Nicole  Oiknine 
John  Ollivan 
Mike  O'Sullivan 
Laura  Radovan 
Dan  Paik 
Rick  Penner 
Bob  Pond 
Robert  Portillo 
Belle  Rabinowitz 
Terese  Richards 
Richard  Roa 
Cathy  Roberts 
Melissa  Roberts 
Bob  Rosenberg 
Bob  Rosenbaum 
Edith  Royal 
Stu  Schifter 
Lisa  Schlein 
Celia  Schwartz 
David  Seidman 
Richard  Shea 
Bob  Sheldon 
Gail  Sidney 
Phyllis  Siegel 
Pearl  Skotnes 
Bruce  E.  Smith 


Patricia  Smith 
Joan  Sprague 
Terry  Squire 
Helen  Steinmetz 
Ron  Streicher 
Ruth  Stroud 
Gary  Tayler 
Ed  Thomas 
Modestine  Thornton 
Jim  Tindall 
Roy  Ulrich 
Howard  Vanucci 
Marvin  Vernon 
Bill  Vestal 
Barbara  Warren 
Andy  Weiss 
Bert  White 
Julie  Wilkerson 
Ned  Wilson 
Jim  Witter 
Katie  Wise 

CETA: 
Bill  Austin 
Raul  Endara 
Rigo  Ortega 
Rose  Park 
Debbie  Vejariel 


Volunteer 


News 


SUBSCRIPTIONS  NEEDS  HELP!  We  especially  need  people  who  like  phone  work;  calling  subscribers  whose  renewal  letters 
have  been  returned  undelivered  because  of  address  changes,  etc.  Also,  mopping  up  on  the  computer  corrections.  Day  or  night 
workers  welcome.  Call  Ahna,  Virginia  or  Jim  Witter,  during  business  hours:  213/  877-2711. 

THE  MIRACLE  WORKS:  A  project  to  get  stuff  needed  by  KPFK.  If  you're  good  at  scavanging,  get  in  touch  with  Dan  Paik. 
You  can  leave  a  message  for  him  here  at  the  station,  or  call  him  directly  at  213/  224-8765  (evenings  are  best).  What  we  need: 

AUDIO  EQUIPMENT:  Sony  TC  142  cassette  machine  /  portable  cassette  machines  of  any  sort  /  high-speed  cassette  dubber  / 
Urie  Graphic  equalizer  /  amplifier  (min.  100  watt)  /  Dynamic  microphones  /  stereo  headsets  /  Ampex  176  recording  tape  /  cas- 
sette tapes  (new  or  used)  /  S"  and  10'/;"  reels  and  boxes  for  %"  tape  /  white  and  yellow  leader. 

OFFICE  EQUIPMENT:  Any  working  typewriters  (an  IBM  Selectric  II  would  be  best.  .  .)  /  McBee  file  card  system  /  Roladexes  / 
dictating  equipment  /  filing  cabinets  /  typewriter  tables  /  shelving  /  desk  chairs  /  table  lamps  /  tape  &  dispensers  /  pens,  pencils  / 
paper  (typing,  scratch,  Savin  copying)  /  correction  liquid,  "white  out"  /  carbon  paper  /  scissors  /  rulers  /  tacks  /  staplers,  staples  / 
receipt  books  /  typewriter  ribbons  /  labels  /  index  cards  /  chalk,  erasers  /  rubber  cement  /  Banker's  Box  Organizer  No.  711  /  bookends. 

ART  SUPPLIES;  graphic  pens  /  art  board  /  rub-on  letters,  any  size  /  border  tape  /  masking  tape  /  wax  (for  waxer)  /  spray  fix  / 
rubylith  stuff  /  clip  art  books,  i.e.,  Dover  /  grease  pencils  /  non-photo  blue  pencils  /  T-squares  /  triangles  /  templates. 

ESSENTIALS  &  MISC:  light  bulbs  /  cleaning  supplies  /  paper  towels  /  toilet  paper  /  extension  cords  /  instant  coffee  (de-caf)  / 
radios  /  cork  bulletin  boards  /  1980  calendars  (space  for  writing)  /  fresh  35mm  film  /  plants  /  stop  watch  /  ethnic  records  /  atlas. 


Our  major  March  feature  has  not 
yet  been  confirmed  as  of  Folio 
deadline.  Listen  for  announcements 
before  the  Morning  &  Evening  News 
and  at  other  time  throughout  the 
day. 

When  the  feature  is  not  printed  in 
the  Folio,  we  will  be  happy  to  send 
you  postcard  notification  IF  you 
send  us  a  packet  of  self-addressed, 
regulation  size,  10c  post  cards  for 
us  to  mail  back  to  you.  Send  to  As- 
sistant Manager  Anita  Styles,  KPFK, 
PO  Box  8639,  Universal  City  91608. 


Classic  FilmSeries: 


"Salt 

of  the  Earth" 


SATURDAY,  MARCH  29 
Fox  Venice  Theater 
620  Lincoln  Blvd.,  Venice 
Time  to  be  announced. 
No  Phone  Reservations. 


1954     94  minutes. 

Directed  by  Herbert  Biberman;  produced  by  Paul 
Jarrico;  screenplay  by  Michael  Wilson;  music  by 
Sol  Kaplan.  With  Rosaura  Revueltas,  Juan  Chacon, 
Will  Geer,  and  members  of  Local  890  of  the  inter- 
national Union  of  Mine,  Mill  and  Smelter  workers. 

Herbert  Biberman  came  into  films  in  the  1 930s,  and  his  di- 
rectorial assignments  alternated  with  those  of  producer  and 
screenwriter.  However,  none  of  these  assignments  was  es- 
pecially noteworthy  until  he  began  work  on  Salt  of  the  Earth, 
which  was  truly  an  inspired  project,  triggered  by  the  fact 
that  Biberman  himself  had  been  named  one  of  the  Holly- 
wood Unfriendly  Ten  during  the  commurris\  witch-hunt  days 
of  the  19505.  Unable  to  work  in  Hollywood,  Biberman  and 
producer  Paul  Jarrico  took  many  of  their  fellow-persecuted 
artists  and  actors  to  location  in  New  Mexico,  and  proceeded 
to  produce  a  film  they  all  ardently  believed  in,  and  one 
which  turned  out  to  be  a  masterpiece.  That  it  was  little 
known  by  film-goers  can  be  attributed  to  the  concerted  ef- 
forts to  have  the  picture  squelched  politically,  even  to  the 


point  of  organizing  projectionists  into  refusing  to  run  it.  A 
semi-documentary  re-creation  of  an  actual  year-long  strike 
of  Mexican-American  zinc  miners,  it  used  mostly  a  non- 
professional cast  except  for  the  principals.  The  drama  cen- 
ters on  the  complex,  changing  relationship  between  one  of 
the  strikers  (Juan  Chacon)  and  his  wife  (Rosaura  Revueltas). 
Salt  of  the  Earth  is  the  only  American  film  with  the  magni- 
ficent Mexican  actress  Revueltas  (sister  of  the  composer). 
Ironically,  the  role  was  intended  for  Biberman's  wife,  Gale 
Sondergaard,  but  she  actually  chose  the  other  actress,  feel- 
ing that  she  herself  was  not  quite  right,  that  it  should  be 
played  by  a  Mexican  woman. 

"The  most  Inspiring  film  of  the  decade  (the  SOs)  was  made 
by  blacklisted  artists.  Salt  of  the  Earth  ...  was  finished  in 
spite  of  interference  by  the  film  industry  and  by  the  govern- 
ment. ...  It  is  the  first  major  American  film  to  deal  honest- 
ly with  the  labor  struggle  and  the  first  to  present  a  minority 
with  dignity  and  understanding." 

-John  Howard  Lawson 
Fi/m:  The  Creative  Process 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  4 


(This  is  NOT  a  Film  Club  program.) 


WOMEN'S  HLM  SERIES 
■^     A  Benefit  for  KPFK 


CELEBRATING  INTERNATIONAL  WOMEN'S  DAY 

MARCH  8th  &  9th 
A  MORNING  OF  FILMS  BY  AND  ABOUT  WOMEN 


■f'A: 


LOl^e  IT  LI  KG  1^  fCDL 

—  A  well-earned  tribute  to  songwriter,  activist  Malvina  Reynolds. 


UNION  MAIDS 


An  Academy  Award  Nominee,  1 977,  about  women  organizing 
Inthe1930's. 


CHICANA 


A  beautifully  filmed  account  of  the  traditional  role 
of  the  Chicana 


The  FLASHETTES 

—  An  inspiring  documentary  about  an  inner-city  girls'  track  club, 
(ages  6-16),  an  inside  look  at  sexism  in  sports. 


SIZE  10 


An  Australian  film  about  women's  body  image,  how  it  is  formed 
and  deformed  by  popular  advertising 


March  8  &  9 
Saturday  Sunday 


At  the  Los  Feliz  Theater 
1822  North  Vermont  Ave. 
Los  Angeles 


At  the  Monica  Theater 
1332  2nd  Street 
Santa  Monica 


BOTH  PROGRAMS: 
10:00  a.m.  to  1:00  p.m. 


Tickets  $5,  at  the  door. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  5 


Highlights 


Music 


THE  WORLD  SERIES. 


Leilie  Lee  built  her  first  radio  when  she  was  10.  Now  she's  Assistant  to 
The  Chief  Engineer.  More  than  half  of  KPFK's  Staff  are  women. 


Two  Special  Days 


IN  HONOR  OF  INTERNATIONAL  WOMEN'S  DAY 

Our  programming  will  focus  on  women  all  day  on  Wed- 
nesday, March  5,  in  honor  of  International  Women's  Day 
(March  8).  On  that  date  in  1909,  "The  Uprising  of  the 
20,000"  began  in  New  York  City:  A  general  strike  among 
sweatshop  workers  to  protest  abominable  working  con- 
ditions and  wage  cuts.  During  the  13  week  strike,  over 
700  women  were  arrested,  beaten  and  abused.  Observa- 
tion of  International  Working  Women's  Holiday  spread 
throughout  the  socialist  world,  but  was  forgotten  in  Am- 
erica until  it  was  rediscovered  more  than  half  a  century 
later  by  feminists  of  the  late  60s. 

For  our  special  day,  we'll  include  a  variety  of  the  most 
requested  programs  from  the  archives  done  by  women 
or  about  women,  some  live  panels  with  open  phones  on 
the  direction  of  the  women's  movement  in  the  new  de- 
cade, and  of  course  plenty  of  music  throughout  the  day, 
by,  for  and  about  women,  ranging  from  popular  to  folk 
to  classical  to  avant  garde.  Please  check  the  listings  for 
March  5  on  pages  14-16. 

And  remember.  .  .  a  radio  station  without  a  male  voice 
for  a  day,  is  like  a  fish  without  a  bicycle. 

A  DAY  OF  CELTIC  CULTURE:  March  17 

Howard  and  Roz  Larman  have  put  together  a  special  day 
to  honor  the  Irish  tradition  on  St.  Patrick's  Day.  Special 
music,  much  of  it  recorded  live  in  concert  locally,  poetry, 
drama,  and  interviews  with  sociologists  who've  specialized 
in  the  traditions  of  the  Irish  in  America  will  be  featured. 
Those  who  follow  the  Larmans'  regular  programs  know 
that  the  music  of  Ireland  is  one  of  their  favorite  subjects, 
so  expect  to  hear  some  fine  examples  on  that  day.  The 
details  are  on  pp.  23-25  in  the  listings. 


This  month,  the  Music  Department  inaugurates  a  new  live 
performance  series  in  our  spacious  upstairs  Studio  Z—  a 
bi-weekly  celebration  of  International  Music  (and  often 
dance).  We  call  it  (naturally)  The  World  Series. 

KPFK's  location  in  Southern  California  provides  our  lis- 
teners access  to  many  great  world  musicians  and  ensembles; 
in  the  next  few  months  we  plan  to  offer  you  concert-broad- 
casts by  masters  of  Chinese,  Persian,  Korean,  West  African, 
Indonesian  and  Indian  musics. 

We  begin,  auspiciously  we  feel,  on  Tuesday,  March  25  with 
a  performance  of  Japanese  Court  Music,  given  under  the 
direction  of  Suenobu  Togi.  Mr.  Togi  served  for  many  years 
as  a  member  of  the  Imperial  Court  Orchestra  in  Japan,  per- 
forming the  Gagaku  music,  which  fs  the  oldest  musical  tra- 
dition still  in  existence  today.  The  ensemble  he  directs  is 
in  residence  at  UCLA. 

All  of  the  concerts  in  The  World  Series  will  be  free  to  the 
public  beginning  at  8:30  p.m.  (arrive  at  8:10  for  best  seats) 
and  are  located  at  our  studios  in  North  Hollywood,  just 
off  the  Lankershim  exit  of  the  Hollywood  Freeway.  The 
Series  is  produced  by  Carl  Stone  and  Lois  Vierk. 

BOSTON  SYMPHONY 

Another  music  note  of  interest:  The  Boston  Symphony 
Orchestra  begins  its  new  day  and  time  of  Thursdays  at 
9:00  p.m.- with  a  program  featuring  the  outstanding  young 
Japanese  conductor  Kazuhiro  Koizumi  and  the  renowned 
flautist  Jean-Pierre  Rampal  in  a  program  of  Glinka, 
Khachaturian,  Bartok  and  Liszt. 

CAL  ARTS  CONTEMPORARY  MUSIC  FESTIVAL 

As  of  press  time,  we  are  trying  to  work  out  all  of  the 
thorny  technical  details  for  bringing  you  live  broadcasts 
from  the  CalArts  Contemporary  Music  Festival  that  will 
be  taking  place  on  their  Valencia  cagnpus  from  March  4 
to  9.  KPFK  will  be  recording  all  of  the  events  for  delayed 
broadcast,  but  if  all  matters  of  a  technical  nature  can  be 
resolved  in  time  by  our  stalwart  chief  engineer,  we'll  be 
broadcasting  the  weekend  concerts  live  and  direct.  The 
Festival  will  include  many  premieres  by  some  of  the  out- 
standing 20th  Century  composers  from  the  United  States 
and  abroad.  Keep  your  fingers  crossed,  and  look  at  the 
box  on  page  17  for  specific  (potential)  concerts. 


And  a  Non-Musical  Edition  of  "Imaginary  Landscape" 

Saturday  March  29's  Imaginary  Landscape  features  a 
performance  of  sound  poetry  by  three  European  avant- 
garde  poets:  Adriano  Spatola  and  F.  Tiziano  (Italy)  and 
.iulien  Blaine  (France).  The  three  have  performed  widely 
in  Europe  and  elsewhere,  and  are  influential   in  their  roles 
as  editors  and  publishers  of  various  anthologies  of  visual  & 
sound  poetry  and  underground  publications.  The  per- 
formance will  be  live  before  a  studio  audience.  Admis- 
sion is  free  but  seating  is  limited,  so  please  call  for  reser- 
vations (213/877-2711)  during  business  hours. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  6 


AfteiMidnight 


"DEPRESSION" 

A  UCLA  Extension  Course  with  Dr.  Carl  Faber 

March  marks  the  beginning  of  another  UCLA  Extension 
course  by  clinical  psychologist  Dr.  Carl  Faber.  The  course 
on  "Depression"  was  especially  picked  by  Dr.  Faber  as 
one  of  his  best.  We  quote  from  the  UCLA  Extension 
catalogue: 

"Most  of  us  have  known  a  significant  depression  in  our 
lives.    Occasioned  by  changes,  losses,  guilt  and/or  rage 
turned  within,  we  gradually  find  ourselves  becoming  dif- 
ferent persons;  our  experience  of  our  bodies,  space  and 
time,  and  relationships  radically  change.  As  depression 
deepens,  functioning  becomes  almost  impossible  and  our 
inability  to  involve  ourselves  makes  us  feel  fraudulent. 
With  time  and  adjustment,  we  get  used  to  depression. 
We  develop  attitudes,  values  and  philosophical  notions 
that  express  and  support  our  chronic  numbness  and 
impotence. 


"Ironically,  the  possibility  of  suicide  is  often  near  as 
depression  begins  to  lift  and  lessen.  This  program  con- 
cludes with  an  understanding  of  this  phenomenon,  as 
well  as  the  factors  involved  in  the  healing  of  depression.' 

The  course  will  air  in  nine  parts  on  "Something's  Hap- 
pening," Tuesday  nights  beginning  March  4th  around 
1:15  a.m.  During  the  course,  the  start  time  will  be  Vi 
hour  earlier  in  two  jumps  as  the  initial  two  opening 
program  series  (Environment  Lectures  and  Jack  Flan- 
ders) end. 

The  books  suggested  by  Dr.  Faber  are  "Climates  of  the 
Mind"  by  Carolyn  Kleefeld,  and  Dr.  Faber's  own  "On 
Listening"  and  "Poems."  The  lectures  were  recorded 
and  furnished  by  UCLA  Extension.  Information  on 
this  and  other  courses  available  from  UCLA  Extension, 
Att'n:  Coleen  River,  Los  Angeles  90024.  Telaphnne 
213/825-4610.  We  again  offer  our  thanks  to  in._M 
Extension  for  furnishing  KPFK  the  tapes  and  permis- 
sion to  broadcast  them. 


CLEARING  THE  SMOKE  FROM  THE  AFTERNOON  AIR 

Anita  Frankel,  producer  of  the  Afternoon  Air,  asked  one  day  for  listener  tips  on  breaking  the  smoking  habit. 
The  calls  poured  in,  with  an  interesting  and  rather  original  inventory  of  suggestions.  Here  are  some  of  the  ways 
KPFK  listeners  have  used  to  put  the  evil  weed  behind  you,  and  keep  it  that  way: 


—  Drink  lobillia  tea  three  times  a  day. 

—  Eat  raw  sunflower  seeds. 

—  Exercise! 

—  Kiss  a  lot. 

—  Distract  yourself  when  you  want  a  smoke. 

—  Be  determined. 

—  Do  it  for  someone  you  love  (lover,  child). 

—  Work  on  loving  yourself! 

—  Drink  lotsa  water. 

—  Suck  cloves. 

—  Drink  liquids  through  a  straw. 

—  Don't  kick  yourself  if  you  take  a  drag—  i.e., 
don't  give  up. 

—  Notice  how  you're  feeling;  be  aware  of  your  body. 

—  Watch  other  smokers— they  look  yeccchy  and 
compulsive. 

—  Time  yourself  when  you  get  the  urge  ("if  I  can  just 
go  two  minutes,  I'll  forget  about  it."). 

—  Take  deep  breaths— fill  your  chest  with  air  (This 
works  good,  follis!  —A.F.) 

And  finally, 

—  You're  losing  a  close  friend.  Allow  yourself  to  grieve. 


Anita  Frankel  sans  cigarette  (photo:  Richard  Hodges). 


As  of  FOLIO  deadline  (early  February),  Anita's  still  sneaking  an  occasional  drag,  but  with  plenty  of  deep 
breathing,  exercise  and  grieving,  she's  confident  that  this  time,  this  is  it!!!  (Maybe.  .  .) 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  7 


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KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  8 


Report  to  the  Listener 


Jim  Berland,  General  Manager 


Within  two  years  of  Pacifica's  founding  in  1949,  the  Uni- 
ted States  was  engulfed  by  a  pervasive  fear.  A  fear  of 
"communism"  which  evidenced  as  a  fear  of  controversy, 
radicalism,  democracy  and  dissent.  It  was  called  the  Cold 
War. 

Cold  War  II  threatens  as  Pacifica  prepares  to  mark  its  31st 
Anniversary,  April  15.  We  would  hope  to  avoid  It,  but  if 
it  comes  it  will  be  a  cold  war  with  a  difference.  The  per- 
vasiveness, the  fear  of  dissent  will  be  resisted  widely.  The 
experience  of  Vietnam  has  left  many  Americans  cynical 
and  untrusting  of  the  government.  The  serious  economic 
problems  facing  the  US  are  unprecedented.  There  is  a 
widespread  search  for  an  alternative  to  the  cold  war  men- 
tality. Pacifica  radio  now  has  five  stations,  and  has  been 
joined  by  50  community  stations  and  more  than  200 
public  radio  stations. 

This  latter  represents  a  possible  force  for  democratic  com- 
munication. Pacifica  occupies  a  unique  place  in  this  world 
of  communication.  We  are  unique,  no  longer  because  of 
our  non-commercial  format,  but  because  of  our  founders' 
dedication  to  the  search  for  peaceful  resolution  of  inter- 
national and  domestic  conflict.  Now  is  the  time  to  renew 
that  dedication. 

We  at  KPFK  will  do  our  best  to  provide  the  staff  support, 
the  journalistic  aggressiveness,  and  the  technical  and  pro- 
duction expertise.  It  is  up  to  the  community  to  provide 
the  intellectual  and  financial  resources.  We  will  renew  our 
dedication  to  combat  cold  war  mentality.  To  provide  a 
platform  for  the  points  of  view  not  permitted  regularly 
in  commercial  media  and  to  search  out  the  information 
necessary  for  all  of  us  to  make  democratic  decisions,  we 
need  your  renewed  support. 

April  12th  we  will  begin  our  spring  RADIOTHON.  After 
two  weeks  of  fundraising,  we  will  return  to  regular  pro- 
gramming for  more  than  three  weeks,  and  we'll  conclude 
the  Radiothon  with  two  weeks  in  May.  Our  goal  Is  to  raise 
$125,000.  This  month  you  will  receive  a  pre-thon  mailing 
asking  for  additional  support  from  those  of  you  who  have 
already  given.  Your  contributions  will  be  counted  toward 
our  goal,  and  your  larger  donations  ($50  or  more)  can  be 
used  as  matching  funds.  I  urge  you  to  respond.  I  also  urge 
those  of  you  who  are  up  for  renewal  to  do  it  now. 

Subscriptions 

As  you  should  know  by  now,  we  have  been  having  mass- 
ive problems  with  the  conversion  of  our  subscription  sys- 
tem from  one  computer  setup  to  another.  We  discovered 
a  basic  error  during  the  past  few  weeks  and  this  March 
Folio  and  mailings  should  reflect  corrections  of  most  prob- 
lems. The  error  was  the  result  of  a  programming  mistake 
which  did  not  absorb  update  information.  Thus,  payments 


made  from  October  through  December  and  early  January 
were  not  reflected  in  the  records.  That  information  has 
now  been  successfully  entered.  There  remain  some  prob- 
lems with  the  system,  some  of  them  affecting  our  oldest 
and  most  generous  supporters.  We  seem  to  have  corrected 
about  1400  cases  of  that  type.  If  you  continue  to  have  a 
problem,  being  billed  when  you  have  paid  (you  should  al- 
low 30  days  for  payments  to  be  recorded),  please  return 
the  bill  or  renewal  notice  with  the  correct  information 
written  on  it  (please  add  your  own  stamp,  it  saves  us  15c). 
Other  problems  to  watch  for:  getting  a  renewal  when  your 
subscription  is  not  due  to  expire  soon;  not  getting  a  re- 
newal bill  when  your  subscription  is  up;  or  incorrect  in- 
formation on  your  bill.  Thanks  for  your  cooperation  and 
patience  during  this  difficult  time.  We  continue  to  hope 
that  the  new  system  will  prove  itself  eventually  with  bet- 
ter service  and  more  reliable  record  keeping  than  the  old 
system. 

People 

You've  probably  noticed  that  Leni  Isaacs  has  taken  a  leave 
of  absence  from  the  Music  Department.  She  is  pursuing 
graduate  studies  in  arts  management  at  UCLA,  but  still 
pops  around  occasionally  to  help  out.  Meanwhile,  her  place 
is  being  ably  filled  by  Lois  Vierk  who  also  serves  as  music 
librarian. 

After  a  year-long  search,  KPFK  has  obtained  the  services 
of  a  Development  Director.  Development  is  the  latest 
euphemism  for  fundraising,  and  also  includes  public  rela- 
tions and  promotion.  Michele  Taylor  comes  to  KPFK  af- 
ter ten  years  of  experience  raising  money  for  the  Brother- 
hood Crusade  in  Los  Angeles.  With  her  help,  we  hope  to 
develop  a  large-donors  program,  do  more  grant  writing, 
and  improve  outreach  and  community  awareness. 

During  the  last  two  months,  I  have  been  putting  in  more 
time  as  Acting  Program  Director.  While  this  is  not  as  satis- 
factory as  having  a  full  time  P.D.,  it  should  beat  none  at 
all.  I  am  examining  KPFK's  ability  to  adequately  the  in- 
creased international  tensions.  We  have  some  serious  weak- 
nesses. If  you  have  knowledge  or  experience  that  could 
help  and  you  have  the  time  and  willingness  to  volunteer, 
please  contact  me. 

Spread  the  word.  There  is  an  alternative  to  Cold  War  II. 
It's  called  Pacifica  and  in  Los  Angeles  it's  at  90.7  fm. 


For  peace. 


t 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  9 


More  Blessed  to  Give. . . 


Have  you  ever  wondered  about  those  premiums  you've 
heard  us  offer  during  fundraising  times?  They  are  our 
way  of  saying  thank  you  to  those  who  pledge  a  donation 
in  response  to  our  requests  for  subscriptions  to  KPFK. 
Those  gifts  that  we  give  away  (records,  bool^s,  movie  and 
theater  ticl<ets,  and  many  other  interesting  things)  are 
given  to  the  station  by  caring  members  of  the 
business  community,  to  help  us  along  in  our 
fundraising.  We  could  never  afford  to  BUY 
premiums  to  give  away,  and  it'd  be  dumb— 
we'd  sooner  lower  the  cost  of  the  subscrip- 
tion! So  each  time  we  gear  up  for  a  fund- 
raiser, we  spend  a  goodly  amount  of  time 
and  energy  scouting  up  new  premiums  to 
give  away. 

Perhaps  you  have  a  premium  for  us!  If 

your  business  deals  in  goods  or  services 

that  you  think  would  be  useful  to  offer 

to  our  listeners  as  a  way  of  enticing 

them  to  pledge,  and  if  you  are  in  a  position 

to  offer  some  of  what  you  have  to  us  to  give 

away,  please  call  us  right  up!  Assistant  Manager 

Anita  Styles  would  love  to  talk  to  you  about  your 

premium,  and  make  the  necessary  arrangements  to 

get  it  to  us  in  time  for  the  Spring  Radiothon  (two  weeks 

in  April  and  two  in  May).  You  know  the  phone  number, 

21 3/  877-271 1 .  Two  things  to  remember  about  giving  us 

premiums:  You'll  feel  great  about  helping  KPFK. . . 


(and.  It's  tax-deductible!) 


Feedback 


March,  1980 

Please  use  more 
paper  if  you 
need  to!  Mail 
to  KPFK 
Feedback, 
PO  Box  8639 
Universal  City 
91608. 
May  we  print 
your  name? 


Do  you  wish 
written  response 


Name  &  address 
(optional): 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  10 


1:00  THE  SUNDAY  OPERA/  Fred  Hyatt 

MOZART:  Don  Giovanni.  Margaret  Price,  Sylvia 
Sass,  sopranos;  Stuart  Burrows,  tenor;  Bernd 
Weil<l,  Gabriel  Bacquier,  baritones;  the  London 
Philharmonic  Orchestra  and  London  Opera  Cho- 
rus are  conducted  by  Sir  Georg  Solti.  London 
OS A  1444. 

5:00  THE  SOUR  APPLE  TREE/  Clare  Spark 

Form,  ideology  and  consciousness.  Critical  analysis 
of  current  cultural  history.  Guests,  phones,  recent 
scholarship.  Entertaining! 

6:00  THE  SUNDAY  NEWS/  Warren,  Johnson,  Thomas 

6:30  THE  SCIENCE  CONNECTION 

Sciencepeople  Steve  and  Vera  Kilston  share  current 
,    thinking  in  the  further  adventures  of  humans  trying 
to  understand  nature.  Call  in  with  questions. 

7:00  PREACHING  THE  BLUES/ Mary  Aldin 

Blues,  Black  gospel  and  boogie  woogie  from  as  far 
back  as  they've  been  recording  it.  Mary  reclaims 
her  G. 

8:30   LESBIAN  SISTERS/  Helene  Rosenbluth 

First  Sunday  each  month  at  this  time,  news,  guests 
and  features  of  the  Lesbian  community. 

9:30  FOLKSCENE/The  Larmans 

Traditional  and  contemporary  American  folk  music 
and  music  from  the  British  Isles,  France,  Australia, 
New  Zealand  and  Canada.  Featuring  live  perform- 
ances, interviews,  and  the  finest  in  recorded  music. 
Produced  by  Howard  and  Roz  Larman. 

12:00  SMOKE  RINGS  /  John  Breckow,  Jay  Green 

Jazz  musicians,  writers,  archivists  and  record 
producers  join  hosts  Breckow  (until  3  a.m.)  and 
Green  (from  3  to  6  a.m.)  for  conversation  and  a 
rich  variety  of  music. 


MONDAY  MARCH  3 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

8:30  REPORT  TO  THE  LISTENER/  Jim  Borland 

A  special  half-hour  out  to  hear  and  speak  with 
KPFK's  General  Manager.  Open  phones. 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Richard 
Berger's  International  Perspective.  Read  All  About 
It:  Richard  Mahler  and  Diana  Martinez.  Calendar: 
compiled  and  read  by  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

All  this  month,  readings  are  selections  from  feminist 
novels  past  &  present,  including  Her/and  written  in 
1910  by  Charlotte  Perkins  Gillman,  about  a  femin- 
ist Utopia;  Rita  Mae  Brown's  Ruby  fruit  Jungle;  and 
Patience  and  Sarah  by  Isabel  Miller,  a  true  story 
based  on  the  romance  of  two  women  iri  1816,  from 
their  diaries. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  News  &v!      s  on  the  arts 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Music  of  the  Americas/  John  Wager-Schneider 

toother  of  Us  All  (1947),  the  opera  by  Virgil  

Thomson  and  Gertrude  Stein,  featuring  the'Sarv 
ta  Fe  Opera  conducted  by  Raymond  Leppard. 


What  were  Blacit  people  saying  about  ttie  direction  of  their 
movement  at  the  turn  of  the  century?  Find  out  on  tonight's 
edition  of  "Family  Tree," l^ondays  at  8:00p.m. 


2:00  ECLECTICA;  Alan  Watts 

"Self  and  Other"  part  3.  For  brochure  of  Alan 
Watts  talks,  send  self-addressed  stamped  envel- 
ope to  MEA,  Box  303,  Sausalito  CA  94965.  Re- 
broadcast  tonight  after  midnight. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  Good  Company 

Billboard,  News  with  your  phone-ins.  At  3:30,  Will 
Kinney  and  Barbara  Spark  with  Organic  Gardening, 
answering  your  food-growing  questions.  At  4:30, 
Barbara  Cady  talks  with  authors  on  Dealing.  At 
5:00,  Body  Politics  with  Dr.  Gary  Richwald  and 
guests— getting  what  you  need  from  the  health  care 
system.  Terry  Hodel  at  5:45  with  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 

Charles'  newsessays  are  heard  every  Monday  and 
Wednesday  at  6:45  p.m.,  and  rebroadcast  the 
following  morning  (Tuesday  &  Thursday)  at  9:15. 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL 

This  time  is  purposely  left  unscheduled,  so  that  we 
may  bring  you  late-breaking  news  in  depth  on  a 
regular  basis. 

7:30    LABOR  SCENE/  Sam  Kushner 

News  of  organized  (and  organizing)  working  people. 

8:00  THE  FAMILY  TREE/ Sylvester  Rivers 

Around  the  turn  of  the  century  there  were  con- 
flicting views  among  Bhack  leaders  concerning  the 
direction  Blacks  should  take.  Everette  Twine,  Pro- 
fessor at  Loyola  and  Southwest  College,  speaks  on 
the  Washington-DuBois  Debates.  Recorded  2/2/80 
at  the  Western  States  Black  Research  Center's  his- 
tory seminar. 

8:30   CHAPEL,  COURT  AND  COUNTRYSIDE 

KPFK's  Showcase  for  Early  Music  features  recent 
releases  of  high  caliber  recordings  of  Renaissance 
and  Baroque  music,  with  host  Joseph  Spencer  live 
in  the  studio  to  comment  on  the  music  and  take 
phone  calls  from  interested  listeners. 

10:00  IN  FIDELITY/  Peter  Sutheim 

KPFK's  weekly  talk  show  for  audiophiles  and  mu- 
sic lovers  presents,  on  the  first  Monday  of  each 
month,   "Beginners'  Night"— to  encourage  new- 
comers to  this  business  of  "artiticial  music"  to 
ask  their  questions.  The  emphasis  is  on  fundament- 
als. Tonight,  loudspeakers,  part  one.  Open  phones. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  13 


11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

Updated  news,  with  features,  comments  &  sports. 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Alan  Watts  speaks  on  "Self  and  Other,"  part  3  of 
4  from  MEA,  Box  303,  Sausalito,  CA  94965.  Then 
open  night  for  various  genre  radio  experience. 


TUESDAY  MARCH  4 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

MOZART:  Le  Nozze  di  Figaro.  Irmgard  Seefried, 
Maria  Stader,  sopranos;  Hertha  Toepper,  contralto; 
Dietrich  Fischer-Dieskau,  Renato  Capecchi,  bari- 
tones. The  Radio  Symphony  Orchestra  of  Berlin 
is  conducted  by  Ferenc  Fricsay.  Deutsche  Gram- 
mophon  2728  004. 

9:00   THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan  (rebroadcast).  Read  All  About  It:  BJ 
Clark  and  Mike  Leviton.  Calendar:  Terry  Model. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

Folk  music  from  the  British  Isles. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Current  cultural  events 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

At  the  Keyboard/  Leonid  Hambro 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  KrishnamurtI 

J.  Krishnamurti  speaks  on  "Mental  Discipline" 
in  the  4th  of  ^  talks  delivered  in  New  York's 
Town  Hall.  For  information  on  Krishnamurti, 
write  Krishnamurti  Foundation,  Box  216,  Ojai 
CA  93023. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Usual  opening  features  Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle 
on  the  News.  Strawberry  Shortbread  at  3:30— all 
about  the  LA  School  System  with  Pat  Benson. 
Open  Air  at  4:00,  followed  at  4:30  with  Barbara 
Cady  and  Dealing.  At  5:00,  Ellen  Stern  Harris 
asks  Who 's  in  Charge?  with  her  guests  and  your 
phone-ins  to  supply  the  answers.  Terry  Hodel  at 
5:45,  with  the  daily  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:30  CARLOS  HAGEN  PRESENTS 

Texas  in  the  Popular  Song.  Texas  has  often  been 
idealized  and  fantasized  in  the  American  imagina- 
tion and  a  good  example  is  Country  &  Western 
music.  In  this  program  Carlos  offers  a  survey  on 
the  many  ways  in  which  Texas  legends  and  folk- 
lore have  been  reflected  in  music  and  song. 

8:30  BACHWEEK-ANSBACH  1979 

(Rescheduled  from  January  3).  For  31  years  now, 
friends  of  Baroque  music  have  been  meeting  in  the 
picturesque  south  German  town  of  Ansbach  to 
celebrate  one  of  the  greatest  German  composers. 
The  "Bach  Week  Ansbach,"  which  consists  exclu- 
sively of  works  composed  by  J.S.  Bach,  stands  out 
as  a  special  event  on  the  international  music  festival 
calendar.  Tonight:  a  Chamber  Music  Concert  with 
Bach's  Trio  for  2  Flutes  and  Harpsichord  in  D  mi- 


nor; Sonata  for  Flutes  and  Continuo  in  C  major  and 
in  E  major;  Sonata  for  2  Flutes  and  Continuo  in  G 
major;  Sonata  for  Flutes,  Violins  and  Continuo  in 
G  major;  Sonata  for  Flutes  and  Harpsichord  in  B 
minor;  Sonata  for  2  Violins  and  Continuo  in  C 
major.  Bettina  Loens,  Ingrid  Salewski,  Paul  Meisen, 
flutes;  Kurt  Guntner,  Peter  Brem,  violins;  Johannes 
Fink,  viola  da  gamba;  Hanns-Martin  Schneidt,  harp- 
sichord. Recorded  by  Inter  Nationes,  Bonn-Bad 
Godesberg. 

NOTE:  The  Boston  Symphony  is  now  heard  on 
Thursday  evenings  at  9:00. 

10:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

Music  of  the  tradition  of  Ustad  Allaudin  Khan. 
Rebroadcast  Saturday  the  8th,  7:30  a.m. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Part  2  of  the  Environment  Lectures  from  Radio 
Canada  International,  "Only  One  Earth"  part  2 
with  Rene  Dubos  (30').  //  From  ZBS  Media  (R.D. 
1,  Fort  Edward  NY  12828),  part  7  of  "The  Incre- 
dible Adventures  of  Jack  Flanders"  (30'):  "A  Fine 
Day  for  Fromborks."  //  We  begin  a  special  9-part 
UCLA  Extension  series  with  Dr.  Carl  Faber,  on 
"Depression."  Part  1,  "The  Beginnings— Shock  and 
Loss"  (ca.  9C').  Tapes  courtesy  UCLA  Extension, 
Att'n  :  Coleen  River,  Los  Angeles  90024,  213/ 
825-4610).  //  Part  7  of  Bill  Hunt's  "The  Musical 
Theater  of  Stephen  Sondheim  (conclusion)"  (60'). 
//  At  4:00,  Bio-Cosmology  with  Jack  Gariss. 


WEDNESDAY  MARCH  5 


International  Women's  Day  Is  this  coming  Saturday, 
March  8.  KPFK  presents  a  day  of  special  programs 
as  our  way  of  honoring  that  special  day. 

6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/ Carl  Stone 

This  morning  featuring  music  by  women  composers 
and  outstanding  women  performers. 

9:00   THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Attorney 
Gloria  Allred  comments  on  the  changing  status 
of  women  in  the  past  decade.  Read  All  About  It: 
Diana  Martinez  and  Helene  Rosenbluth  present 
articles  about  women  in  both  the  U.S.  and  other 
countries. 

10:00  WHAT  WOMAN  AND  WHO  MYSELF  I  AM 

Rosalie  Sorrells  produced  this  program  in  1974 
incorporating  folk  song  and  poetry  about  women's 
experience.  Poetry  includes  selected  works  of  Syl- 
via Plath,  Anne  Sexton,  and  Denise  Levertov.  The 
reader  is  Rosalie  Sorrells.  With  music  by  Frankie 
Armstrong,  Terry  Garthwaite,  Toni  Brown,  Bon- 
nie Raitt,  Billie  Holliday,  Carmen  McCrae,  Dori 
Previn,  and  others. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

All  this  month,  the  morning  readings  are  selections 
of  feminist  novels  past  and  present,  including 
Herland  written  in  1910  by  Charlotte  Perkins  Gill- 
man,  about  a  feminist  Utopia;  Rita  Mae  Brown's 
Ruby  fruit  Jungle;  and  Patience  and  Sarah  by  Isabel 
Miller,  a  true  story  based  on  the  romance  of  two 
women  in  1816,  from  their  diaries. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  14 


INFERmTIOmL  140V1EN'S  D4Y 


11:30  THE  POETRY  OF  NTOZAKE  SHANGE 

Read  by  Ntozake  Shange,  highly  acclaimed  poet 
and  playwright,  author  of  For  Colored  Girls  Who 
Have  Considered  Suicide,  When  the  Rainbow  is 
Enuf.  .  . 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Leni  Isaacs  Presents  music  and  interviews  with 
five  women  in  contemporary  classical  music.  In- 
cluded are  Thea  Musgrave,  Selma  Kramer,  Carol 
Rosenbuerger,  Anna  Rubin  and  Joan  LaBarbara. 
Lois  Vierk,  of  KPFK's  Music  Department  and  a 
composer  herself,  will  play  works  by  a  few  of  the 
many  contemporary  women  composers.  Featured 
wi'l  be  pieces  by  Pauline  Oliveros,  LaBarbara,  and 
Laurie  Anderson,  along  with  several  works  of  Los 
Angeles  composers:  Lotus  for  instrumental  ensem- 
ble and  electronics  by  Alexina  Louie,  and  Lois' 
Inverted  Fountain  for  six  trombones. 

2:00  WHAT  HAVE  WOMEN  DONE 

A  sound  essay  on  the  history  of  worming  women 
in  the  United  States  produced  in  1974  by  Barbara 
Cady. 

3:00  THE  RISE  OF  THE  CHICANA:  Fact  or  Fiction? 

Diana  Martinez  explores  this  issue  through  inter- 
views with  Chicana  feminists  shedding  some  light 
on  the  role  of  the  Chicana  in  the  feminist  movement. 

3:30  WOMEN  PASSING 

What  did  strong  independent  women  do  in  the  late 
1800s  and  early  1900s  in  order  to  break  away  from 
traditional  women's  jobs?  Many  women  dressed  as 
men,  and  successfully  "passed."  Lynne  Fonfa, 
member  of  the  Lesbian  History  Project  talks  about 
such  women.  Produced  by  Helene  Rosenbluth. 


4:00  SO  YOU'VE  HEARD  IT  BEFORE 

The  story  of  South  African  women  under  Apartheid, 
protrayed  through  poetry  and  music.  Includes  des- 
cription of  the  Sharpeville  protest  and  the  Soweto 
uprisings.  Produced  by  Susan  Anderson  and  Pearl 
Skotnes. 

5:00  TRIBUTE  TO  MALVINA  REYNOLDS  (1900-1978) 

In  the  midst  of  our  celebration  of  International  Wo- 
men's Day,  we  honor  a  working  woman  who  devoted 
her  life  to  organizing,  teaching  and  loving,  through 
many  a  song. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Gloria  Allred 

7:00   IWY 

In  November  of  1977,  20,000  women  showed  up 
in  Houston,  Texas  for  the  First  Conference  for 
Women  ever  sponsored  by  the  U.S.  government. 
Some  of  the  people  there  were  Betty  Friedan, 
Coretta  King,  and  Bella  Abzug.  Some  of  the  is- 
sues: abortion,  the  ERA,  child  abuse,  minority 
rights,  nuclear  power,  prostitution  and  homosexu- 
ality. Lisa  Schlein  was  there  and  produced  this 
documentary. 

8:00  WOMEN  IN  THE  80s:  Live  Panel 

Where  have  we  come  in  this  the  first  year  of  the 
new  decade.  What  can  we  expect  on  issues  of 
abortion,  sexual  harrassment,  lesbian  rights,  fe- 
minist education,  minority  women,  and  the  ERA. 
Helene  Rosenbluth  hosts  this  live  panel  includ- 
ing feminist  activist  Sherna  Gluck  and  former 
candidate  for  school  board  Maria  Elena  Gaitan, 
among  others.  Your  participation  is  welcome 
via  the  telephone. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  15 


9:00  NO  FROWN  OF  MINE 

A  dramatized  documentary  on  the  life  of  Sylvia 
Plath.  Scripted  by  Maureen  Mcllroy  from  Plath's 
poems  and  letters. 

10:30  WOMEN  ON  WHEELS  CONCERT 

Women's  culture  has  enriched  the  women's  move- 
ment twofold.  Holly  Near,  Cris  Williamson,  Meg 
Christian  and  Margie  Adam  contributed  a  great 
deal  to  this  new  concept  of  Woman's  Music.  This 
tape  marked  the  first  national  tour  of  women's 
music  in  1975.  Produced  by  Karia  Tonella  from 
our  Sister  Station  KPFA  in  Berkeley. 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Special  Women's  Day  program!  "What's  Doin' 
Ladies"  with  Jay   Stewart  (30',  ABC  10/30/47). 
//  "Screen  Guild  Theatre:  Junior  Miss"  with  Peggy 
Ann  Garner  (30',  CBS  9/30/46).  //  "Lux  Radio 
Theatre:  National  Velvet"  with  Elizabeth  Taylor 
and  Mickey  Rooney  (60',  CBS  2/3/47).  //  "My 
Friend  Irma"  with  Marie  Wilson  (1/27/57,  30').  // 
"Candy  Matson:  The  Egyptian  Amulet"  (30', 
1949-50).  //  "CBS  Radio  Workshop:  Annie  Christ- 
mas" (10/19/56,  30').  //  "Lux  Radio  Theatre: 
Mrs.  Miniver"  (60',  nd).  //  Hedda  Hopper  (CBS, 
4/30/45)  and  Evangeline  Baker,  News  (audition) 
(9/22/47,  30'  total).  //  "The  Adventures  of  Sher- 
lock Holmes:  A  Scandal  in  Bohemia"  with  Basil 
Rathbone  and  Nigel  Bruce  (12/10/45,  30'). 
Happy  Women's  Day! 


THURSDAY  MARCH  6 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

STRAVINSKY:  Symphony  in  C  major.  L'Orchestre 
de  la  Suisse  Romande  is  conducted  by  Ernest  Anser- 
met.  London  STS  15490. 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan  (rebroadcast).  Read  All  About  It:  Richard 
Berger  &  Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi.  Calendar:  Terry 
Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

English  ballad  singer  Lou  Killen  is  the  guest. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  and  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Double  Take/ Gretchen  Henkel 

Review  of  a  play  in  which  a  representative  of 
the  play  in  question  is  present  to  respond. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Chapel,  Court  and  Countryside/  Joseph  Spencer 

Repeat  of  one  of  the  regular  Monday  evening 
early  music  programs. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  The  Big  Broadcast/  Bobb  Lynes 

Two  Amos  N'  Andy  shows,  one  from  10/10/48 
and  the  second  from  10/24/48.  One  of  the  most 
popular  shows  in  the  USA  from  the  20s  to  the  50s. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/  Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  At  3:30, 
Inside  L.A.  's  Bob  Pugsley  continues  his  series  on 
City,  Sea  and  Desert.  Open  air  at  4;00.  At  4:30, 
Barbara  Cady's  Dealing.    LA  5  PM  features  a 
Solar  Powered  3/4  Hour  this  week  (first  &  third 
Thurs.  of  the  month).  Bobby  Nelson,  JPL  scien- 


tist, and  Michele  Prichard  of  the  Citizens'  Party 
are  our  experts  on  solar  transition.  Open  phones. 
Terry  Hodel  at  5:45  with  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING    NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

Thursday's  edition  emphasizes  bilingual  features. 

7:30  EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish 

A  weekly  public  affairs  program  produced  by 
KPBS  in  San  Diego. 

8:00   L.A.  IN  FOCUS/  Luis  Torres 

NEW  NAME.    Luis  Torres'  La  Vida  Latina  branches 
out  to  cover  a  broader  spectrum  of  Los  Angeles 
goings-on,  including  arts,  entertainment,  and  news. 

9:00  BOSTON  SYMPHONY:  Live  In  Concert 

NEW  NIGHT.  A  schedule  shift  to  allow  for  a  new 
series  of  live  concerts  on  Tuesday  evenings.  GLINKA: 
Overture,  Russian  and  Ludmila;  KHACHATURIAN: 
Flute  Concerto;  BARTOK;  Dance  Suite;  LISZT: 
Les  Preludes.  Jean-Pierre  Rampal,  flute.  Kazuhiro 
Koizumi  conducts.  William  Pierce  hosts.  Recorded 
using  the  Dolby  A  Noise  Reduction  System  (pro- 
gram subject  to  change). 

11:00  JANUS  COMAPNY  RADIO  THEATRE 

LIVE!  "The  Price  of  Gold,"  a  new  radio  play  writ- 
ten, produced  and  directed  by  Jan  and  Mallory 
Geller.  Also  featuring  Mike  Hodel  and  Jan  Rabson. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

We  continue  our  evolution  of  open  phone  night. 
Then  open  programming  until  5  a.m.  when  Krishna- 
murti  speaks  on  "Love,  Death  and  Sorrow,"  re- 
corded in  1976  in  Ojai.  For  information  write  to 
the  KrishnamurtI  Foundation,  PO  Box  216,  Ojai 
CA  93023.  This  Is  the  first  of  6  talks. 


FRIDAY  MARCH  7 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/ Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Lowell 
Ponte,  right  wing  anarchist.  Read  All  About  It: 
Diana  Martinez  &  Marty  Burton.  Calendar:  Terry 
Hodel. 

10:00  INDEPENDENT  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

Music  from  the  small  companies. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  and  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR 

Regular  weekly  wrap-up  on  the  arts,  conducted  by 
Cultural  Affairs'  Paul  VangellstI,  Bill  Hunt,  and 
Dean  Cohen. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Soundboard/  John  Wager-Schneider 

LATIN  AMERICAN  GUITAR  (Part  1).  Special 
guest  performer  Richard  Stover  will  play,  discuss 
and  illustrate  music  from  Argentina,  Brazil,  Chile, 
Cuba,  etc.  including  many  recordings  unavailable 
in  this  country. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  Soviet  Lives 

A  series  produced  at  KPFA  by  William  Mandel. 
English  in  right  channel,  Russian  in  the  left.  1) 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  16 


comment  on  DC  Berkeley  literature  course  in 
which  Solzhenitsyn  and  Mandelstam  are  used  to 
illustrate  "Soviet"  literature  and  provide  a  sense 
of  life  in  the  USSR.  2)  Translated  taped  conversa- 
tion with  Soviet  TV  filmmaker  of  Oriental  (Kirgiz) 
nationality  about  his  goals  in  his  work,  ecology, 
relationship  with  his  father.  Series  continues  on 
Fridays  at  this  hour. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Franke!  in  good  company 
Start  with  Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News. 
Followed  by  free-form  radio  In  Good  Company,  un- 
til 5:00  when  Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi  offers  Afec//o- 
Watch.  Calendar  with  Terry  Model  at  5:45. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45   OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

7:00  THE  HEALTH  DEPARTMENT/  A!  Huebner 

There  had  never  been  a  serious  nuclear  accident 
until  Three  Mile  Island,  right?  Wrong!  A  catalog 
of  significant  accidents  is  included  as  a  part  of  a 
crash  course  in  nuclear  power,  courtesy  of  Re- 
search Group  1. 

8:00  LE  JAZZ  HOT  &  COOL/  John  Breckow 

10:00  HOUR  25:  Science  Fiction 

News,  features,  guests,  reviews,  open  phones,  etc. 
with  Mike  Hodel,  Terry  Hodel,  &  John  Henry  Thong. 
At  11 :30,  Linda  Strewn  offers  Futurewatch. 

12:00  GOODBYE  PORKPIE  HAT/  Paul  Vangelisti 

2:00  NOCTURNAL  TRANSMISSIONS  /  Ed    Hammond 


SATURDAY  MARCH  8 


6:00  MORNING  OF  THE  WORLD/  Lois  Vierk 

A  talk,  with  numerous  musical  examples,  by  Robert 
Garfias  on  the  African  mbira,  thumb  piano. 

7:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

From  the  tradition  of  Ustad  Allaudin  Khan.  Re- 
broadcast  from  Tuesday  the  4th,  10:30  p.m. 


8:30   THE  NIXON  TAPES/  Tom  Nixon 

9:30    HALFWAY  DOWN  THE  STAIRS/  Ruth  Buell 

10:30  FOLK  MUSIC/  John  Davis 

12:25  WEEKEND  CALENDAR/  Terry  Hodel 

12:35  THE  CAR  SHOW/  Len  Frank,  John  Retsek 

2:00  BALLADS,  BANJOS  &  BLUEGRASS/  Tom  Sauber 

3:00  WE  CALL  IT  MUSIC/  Jim  Seeley,  Tom  Halladay 

4:00  JAZZ  OMNIBUS/  Ron  Pelletier 

5:30  EN  FOQUE  NACONAL:  Spanish  Public  Affairs 

6:00   THE  SATURDAY  NEWS/ Larry  Moss 

6:30  A  SCOFF  OF  REVIEWERS 

Critics  and  reviewers  of  our  Cultural  Affairs  De- 
partment open  the  phones  to  some  of  yours. 

7:45  THE  WELL-TEMPERED  WREADER/  Jed  Rasula 

8:00  THE  WILLIAM  MALLOCH  PROGRAMME 

10:00  IMAGINARY  LANDSCAPE 

Two  works  of  electro-acoustic  music.  First,  Grande 
Polyphonic  (Grand  Polyphony),  by  Francois  Bayle, 
realized  in  the  studios  of  the  Groupe  de  Recherche 
Musicale;  then,  by  Constin  Miereanu,  we  hear  his 
Luna  Cimse  (Chinese  Moon)  realized  in  the  stu- 
dios of  Studi  Ricordi,  Milan.  Carl  Stone  hosts. 

12:00  TESSERACT/  Phil  Mendelson 

Contemporary  and  electronic  music. 

2:00  HEPCATS  FROM  HELL/  Richard  Meltzer 


SUNDAY  MARCH  9 

6:00  GOSPEL  CARAVAN/ Prince  Dixon 

9:00  BIO-COSMOLOGY/ Jack  Gariss 

11:00  DOROTHY  HEALEY:  Marxist  commentary 

12:00  MANY  WORLDS  OF  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 


As  we  go  to  press,  the  Music  Department  is  attempting  to  complete  negociations  for  a  live  broadcast  of  the  Contemporary 
Music  Festival  from  California  Institute  of  the  Arts.  IF  the  necessary  electronic  arrangements  can  be  made,  the  Festival 
will  pre-empt  regularly  schedule  programing  as  shown  below.  Otherwise,  the  above  schedule  will  be  in  effect. 


8  SaturdaQT    Sunday    9 


5:30  p.m. 

JO  KONDO:  Summer  Days;  Stephen  L.  MOSKO;  Cos- 
mology of  Easy  Listening;  Nils  VIGELAND:  Vara. 

8:00  p.m. 

A  concert  by  SONOR,  Bernard  Rands,  director.  Robert 
ERICKSON:  Night  Music,  Ed  Harkins,  trumpet;  Jacob 
DRUCKMAN;  Animus  IV,  Paul  Sperry,  tenor;  William 
KRAFT:  The  Sublime  and  the  Beautiful  (1979),  based 
on  texts  by  Dostoevsky  and  Rambaud;  Ernst  KRENEK: 
Flute  Piece  in  Nine  Phases,  op.  1 71 ;  Bernard  RANDS: 
Metalepsis,  Ann  Chase  soloist. 


4:00  p.m. 

Lukas  FOSS:  Paradigm  (1969),  performed  by  the  Las 
Vegas  Chamber  Players;  Earle  BROWN:  Colder  Piece 
(1963-66),  Cal  Arts  Percussion  Ensemble;  Toru 
TAKEMITSU:  Stanza  (1969),  Cal  Arts  Orchestra. 

7:00  p.m. 

Leonard  ROSENMAN:  Chamber  Music  K(1979),  Carol 
Urban,  piano,  the  Las  Vegas  Chamber  Players,  conducted 
by  Virko  Baley;  Virko  BALEY:  Lamentations  of  Adrian 
Lewrkuehn  (1980)  John  Kuykers,  tenor,  the  Las  Vegas 
Chamber  Players;  Ralph  SHAPEY;  Concerto  for  Clarinet 
and  Chamber  Group  (1954)  with  Felix  Viscuglia,  clarinet 
and  the  Las  Vegas  Chamber  Players;  Morton  SUBOTNICK: 
After  the  Butterfly   (1979),  Mario  Guarneri,  trumpet, 
the  Twentieth-Century  Players. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  17 


A    LAEIVin/lUE     THEATRE 

flOYAL  THEATRE^ 

11523  Santa  Monica  Btvd 
W«*l  Los  Angvlv*.  CA  K>02S 

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Oeneral  Admisaton      S3.00 

SPECIAL    DISCOUNT    TICKET 

B      Admisalona  S  13.50 


SAT.  &  sars. 

11:00  A  JA. 


PHYLLIS  OE  PICCtOTT 
IN  ASSOQATION  WnH 

LAEMMLE  THEATRES 

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Gieai  Bniom.  with  Laurence  O'lviar  itarred  m  tne  litie  roje 
The  (esuit   n  a  Mm  ot  eloquence  and   exormg  mtimacy  * 

Aa  O'wier  sxpiams     This  is  not  a 
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pedocnance  ol  iheni 


•STUDENT  SHOWS  10  A.M.   Roval-Fri.   Rsquire-Mon. 
RESERVATIONS  REQUIRED    Feb. 29       Mai. 3 


Mar  8-9 

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Maris -16 


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KING  LEAH 

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KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  18 


1:00  THE  SUNDAY  OPERA/  Fred  Hyatt 

DE  FALLA:  La  Vida  Breve,  with  Teresa  Berganza, 
Alice  Nafe  and  Jose  Carreras.  The  Ambrosian  Opera 
Chorus  and  London  Symphony  Orchestra  are  con- 
ducted by  Garcia  Navarro. 

5:00  THE  SOUR  APPLE  TREE/ Clare  Spark 

6:00  THE  SUNDAY  NEWS 

6:30  THE  SCIENCE  CONNECTION/  Kilstons 

7:00  PREACHING  THE  BLUES/  Mary  Aldin 

8:30  IMRU/  The  Gay  Radio  Collective 

9:30   FOLKSCENE/The  Larmans 

Traditional  and  contemporary  folk  music,  mostly 
live,  with  artist  interviews. 

12:00  SMOKE  RINGS/  John  Breckow,  Jay     Green 


MONDAY  MARCH  10 

6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Mike  Hall's 
Libertarian  Viewpoint.  Read  All  About  It:  Mahler 
&  Martinez.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  &  present. 
11:30  KULCHUR:  News  &  views  on  the  arts 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Music  of  the  Americas/  John  Wager-Schneider 

Music  of  Dane  Rudhyar:  Advent,  Crisis  &  Over- 
coming for  String  Quartet,  and  various  piano  music. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  Alan  Watts 

"Self  and  Other,"  part  4  and  last  of  this  seminar. 
Rebroadcast  tonight  shortly  after  midnight. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  Good  Company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News  until  3:30, 
when  Will  Kinney  and  Barbara  Spark  offer  Organic 
Gardening.  Barbara  Cady  at  4:30  with  Dealing.  Ida 
Honorof  at  5:00  with  Consumer  A  wareness.l errs 
Hodel  at  5:45  with  the  daily  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

7:30  LABOR  SCENE/  Sam  Kushner 

8:00  FAMILY  TREE/ Sylvester  Rivers 

Ron  Townson,  formerly  of  The  Fifth  Dimension, 
will  talk  about  the  role  of  Blacks  in  music. 

8:30   CHAPEL,  COURT  AND  COUNTRYSIDE 

This  program,  which  has  been  twice  rescheduled 
since  November,  features  popularized  adaptations 
of  Renaissance  and  Baroque  classic;?,  performed  by 
such  artists  as  Walter  Carlos,  the  Modern  Jazz  Quar- 
tet, the  Swingle  Singers  and  others,  compared  with 
performances  by  classical  artists  who  attempt  to 
adhere  as  closely  as  possible  to  the  original  inten- 
tions of  the  composers.  Number  323. 

10:00  IN  FIDELITY/  Peter  Sutheim 

The  Agony  of  Record  Production:  How  to  do 
everything  right  and  lose  your  mind.  A  conversa- 


tion with  James  Boyk,  pianist,  teacher,  audio  con- 
sultant, about  his  attempt  to  make  the  perfect  pi- 
ano recording.  With  excetpts  from  his  newest  Per- 
formance Recordings  release.  Open  phones. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Alan  Watts  speaks  on  "Self  and  Other,"  part  4  of  4. 


TUESDAY  MARCH  11 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/ Carl  Stone 

DVORAK:  Legends.  The  English  Chamber  Or- 
chestra is  conducted  by  Rafael  Kubelik.  Deutsche 
Grammohpon  2530  786. 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan  (rebroadcast).  Read  All  About  It:  BJ 
Clark  and  Mike  Leviton.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

Sampler  of  traditional  and  contemporary  folk  music. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Backstage/  Gil  Laurence 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

At  the  Keyboard/  Leonid  Hambro 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  Tim  Leary 

Where  is  Tim  Leary  at  now?  What  is  his  new 
night  club  act  like?  "Conversessions  with  Tim 
Leary"  (sic)  features  an  interview  with  Leary 
and  excerpts  from  his  act.  Produced  9/79  by 
John  Underwood. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angel  on  the  News.  At  3:30, 
Strawberry  Shortbread,  with  Pat  Benson  on  schools. 
Unscheduled  feature  at  4:00.  Barbara  Cady  at  4:30, 
with  Dealing.  Who's  In  Charge?  at  5:00,  with  Ellen 
Stern  Harris  and  guests.  Terry  Hodel  at  5:45  with 
Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

7:30  CARLOS  HAGEN  PRESENTS 

Tarot  Cards,  Their  Magic  and  Mystery.  In  this 
program,  Carlos  presents  a  conversation  with 
the  late  Dr.  Walter  Starkie,  famed  scholar  and 
authority  on  Gypsies.  In  this  conversation.  Dr. 
Starkie  explains  the  deep  meaning  and  philoso- 
phical symbolism  of  each  one  of  the  Tarot  cards 
used  by  Gypsies. 

8:30  TUESDAY  EVENING  CONCERT 

To  be  announced. 

10:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 
11:30  THE  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

■  12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Part  3  of  Radio  Canada  International's  "Environ- 
ment" lectures  with  "The  Seas."  Speaker  is  Thor 
Heyerdahl  (30').  //  Part  8  of  ZBS  Media's  "The 
Incredible  Adventures  of  Jack  Flanders,"  "Cap- 
tain Jack  and  the  Pirate  Queen."  //  "Depression," 
talk  2  of  9  with  Dr.  Carl  Faber  speaking  on  "The 
Beginnings,  Rage  and  Impotence"  (ca  90')  from 
UCLA   Extension.  //  From  Radio  Finland,  "Be- 
fore Beirut,"  a  story  by  Veikko  Huovinen  (15'). 
//  At  4  a.m.,  Bio-Cosmology  with  Jack  Gariss. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  19 


The  Poem 
That  Never 
Ends,  a  series 
produced  by 
the  North 
American 
Poetry 
Network. 
Wednesday, 
9:00  p.m. 


WEDNESDAY  MAfiCH  12 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Jeff  Norton 
on  school  desegregation.  Read  All  About  It:  Bill 
Sheppard  &  Helene  Rosenbluth.  Calendar:  Terry 
Model. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Theatre  Close-Up/  Ray  Tatar 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT/  John  Wager-Schneider 

HENZE:  Wind  Quintet  (1952).  STOCKHAUSEN: 
Prozession  ('67);  BERG:  Kammermusik  ('25); 
Piano  Sonata  ('08). 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  Finland  /  Fourth  Tower 

From  Radio  Finland,  "Antti  Goes  Matchmaking" 
by  Maiju  Lassila  (1868-1918).  This  extract  from 
the  beginning  of  a  famous  comic  novel  is  an  ex- 
ample of  Finnish  country  humor  at  its  best.  Then 
from  ZBS  Media  (RD  1,  Fort  Edward  NY  12828), 
part  3  of  "The  Fourth  Tower  of  Inverness,"  a  sur- 
realistic adventure  satire  in  masterful  stereo  (ear- 
phones suggested  if  possible),  and  it's  slightly 
OVER  30' long. 

3:05  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anlta  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News  Headlines,  followed  at  3: 10  by 
The  Absolute  Truth.  Ruth's  Kitchen  at  3:30. 
At4:00,  Ain't  No  Stop  pin '  Us  Now:  R  o  n  G  ray  - 
son  continues  his  monthly  series  focusing  on  the 
life  of  Black  people  in  LA.  At  4:30,  Jon  Brower's 
Eye  on  Sports,  and  at  5:00,  women  hold  up  More 
Than  Half  the  Sky.  Calendar  with  Terry  Model,  5:45. 


6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/ Charles  Morgan 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:30   UP  FROM  THE  ASH  GROVE 

A  special  edition  with  Ed  Pearl  and  co-host  Jinnnni 
Hori-Echoes  from  far  apart  places— soul  music 
from  around  the  world  as  v/ell  as  the  party  beat. 
Reggae,  Ska,  Punk  and  Pop.  Plus. 

9:00  THE  POEM  THAT  NEVER  ENDS 

Continuing  a  26-part  poetry  series  (two  parts  to 
be  aired  each  month),  produced  by  the  North 
American  Poetry  Network  in  Washington  DC. 
Program  3:  Travelling.  Galway  Kinnell:  "Middle 
of  the  Way."  Carolyn  Forche:  "Fo  r  the  Stranger." 
Liam  Rector:  "An  Origin  of  Art."  Ai:  "The  Kid;" 
"The  Ravine."  Charles  Levendosky:  "Driving 
Through  Nebraska.  .  .  "  Beth  Joselow:  "Gypsies 
1-4."  Russell  Edson:  "The  Traveller."  Myra  Skla- 
rew:  "from  The."   Charles  Simic:  "Explorers." 
Galway  Kinnell:  "Under  the  Maud  Moon." 
Alan  Austin,  Executive  Producer.  Elizabeth 
Wray,  Producer.  Frank  Bullard,  Producing  Engi- 
neer. Steve  Waldhorn  hosts. 

Program  4:  Dan  McCrimmon:  "Legend  of  Washeen." 
Sterling  Brown:  "Odyssey  of  Big  Boy;"  "Long 
Gone;"  "After  Winter;"  "Slim  Greer;"  "Slim 
Lands  a  Job;"  "Slim  in  Atlanta;"  "Slim  in  Hell." 
Alan  Austin,  Executive  Producer.  Keith  Talbot, 
Producer.  Frank  Bullard,  Producing  Engineer. 
Steve  Waldhorn  hosts. 

For  further  information  on  this  series,  contact 
the  Watershed  Foundation,  930  F  Street  NW, 
Washington  DC  20004. 

10:00  THE  BIG  BROADCAST/  Bobb  Lynes 

Lux  Radio  Theatre:  "All  About  Eve"  with  Bette 
Davis  (1951)  and  Gulf  Screen  Guild  Theatre:  "A 
Star  is  Born"  (1940)  with  Loretta  Young. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

"War  and  Peace"  pages  124-140  read  by  Daiton 
Trumbo  and  Robert  Moss  (37').  //  Nikos  Tesia, 
Electrical  Wizard  (60')  produced  by  Burt  Wilson. 
//  "Favorite  Story:  Moby  Dick"  with  William  Con- 
rad, Howard  Duff  and  Frank  Lovejoy  (30').  // 
"Luv,"  a  comedy  by  Murray  Schisgal,  starring  Eli 
Wallach,  Anne  Jackson  and  Alan  Arkin,  directed 
by  Mike  Nichols  (Columbia  DOL  318),  original 
cast  recording  (ca  120').  //  "Favorite  Story:  Lodg- 
ing for  a  Night"  with  William  Conrad,  Ronald 
Colman  and  Janet  Waldo  (30).  //  At  5  a.m.,  parts 
7  &  8  of  ZBS  Media's  "The  Incredible  Adventures 
of  Jack  Flanders,"  "A  Fine  Day  for  Fromborks" 
and  "Captain  Jack  and  the  Pirate  Queen."  ZBS  is 
reachable  at  RD  1 ,  Fort  Edward,  NY  12828. 


THURSDAY  MARCH  13 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/ Carl  Stone 

Featured  work  is  HAYDN's  Theresienmesse. 
Elisabeth  Speiser,  soprano;  Maureen  Lehane, 
contralto;  Theo  Altmeyer,  tenor;  Wolfgang 
Schoene,  bass.  The  Boys  Choir  of  Toelzer  and 
the  t   >llegium  Aureum  are  under  the  direction 
of  Franzjosef  Maier.  BASF  20  22287-3. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  20 


9:00  THIS  MORNING  &  Report  to  the  Listener 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan  (rebroadcast).  9:30  Special:  A  phoned- 
in  Report  to  the  Listener  from  Manager  Jim 
Berland,  who  is  currently  attending  the  National 
Public  Radio  conference  in  Kansas  City.  Fol- 
lowed by  an  abbreviated  Read  All  About  It: 
Richard  Berger  &  Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi.  Calen- 
dar: Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

An  hour  of  Cajun  music  with  Chris  Barrow,  Mike 
McClellan  and  Friends. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  &  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Open  time 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Chapel,  Court  &  Countryside/  Joseph  Spencer 

Reprises  of  KPFK's  Showcase  for  Early  Music. 
Your  host  &  producer  Joseph  Spencer  takes  us 
back  through  history  with  the  often  beautiful, 
sometimes  bizarre  sounds  of  music  of  our  dis- 
tant past. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  The  Big  Broadcast 

"Lux  Radio  Theatre"  from  3/25/46,  "Wonder- 
man"  with  Danny  Kaye  (rehearsal).  Host  is 
Bobb  Lynes. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

3:00,  Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News. 
3: 15,  Grace  Jacobs'  Speaking  of  Seniors.  3:30, 
unscheduled  special  feature.  4:00,  Ain't  No  Stop- 
pin'  Us  Now:  Ron  Grayson  continues  this  month's 
exploration  of  life  for  Blacks  in  Los  Angeles.  4:30, 
Barbara  Cady  does  Dealing.  On  LA  5  PM,  Anita 
hosts  topical  guests  and  call-ins.  5:45,  Terry  Ho- 
del's  Calendar. 

6:00   THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45   OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

Thursday's  Open  Journal  offers  Spanish  language 
features  produced  in-  and  out  of  house. 

7:30  EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish 

A  weekly  roundup  of  news  and  features  of  na- 
tional interest,  in  Spanish.  Produced  by  KPBS 
in  San  Diego,  a  National  Public  Radio  station. 
Rebroadcast  Saturday  afternnoon,  5:30  p.m. 

8:00   L.A.  IN  FOCUS 

NEW  NAME.  La  Vida  Latina  undergoes  a  transi- 
tion. Producer  Lais  Torres  offers  interviews  and 
features  about  the  Southern  California  arts  and 
entertainment  scene  as  well  as  interviews  with 
Los  Angeles  area  newsmakers.  Says  Torres:  "It 
will  be  a  lively,  provocative  forum  to  examine 
important  arts  and  political  goings-on  that  have 
an  appeal  to  a  wide  listening  audience." 

9:00  BOSTON  SYMPHONY:  Live  in  Concert 

NEW  SLOT.  We've  moved  the  Boston  Symphony 
series  to  Thursday  evenings  to  make  room  for  a 
special  music  series  on  Tuesdays  (see  highlights). 
MENDELSSOHN:  Escerpts  from  Midsummer 
Night's  Dream;  Capriccio  brillant  for  Piano  and 
Orchestra;  CHOPIN:  Andante  spinato  and  Grande 
Polonaise;  BARTOK:  Concerto  for  Orchestra. 
Malcolm  Frager,  piano.  Joseph  Silverstein  con- 
ducts. William  Pierce  hosts.  Recorded  using  the 
Dolby  A  Noise  Reduction  System  (program  sub- 
ject to  change). 


Spanish  and 
bilingual  news 
and  public 
affairs  are 
featured  on 
Ttiursday's 
evening  line- 
up: Starting 
at  6:45  with 
Open  Journal, 
then  at  7:30 
it's  En  Foque 
Nacional,  and 
8:00  has  the 
new  program 
L.A.  in  Focus. 


11:00  JANUS  COMPANY  RADIO  THEATRE 

KPFK's  own  repertory  playhouse  featuring  Specu- 
lative Fiction,  Fantasy,  Mystery  and  Comedy.  With 
Jan  Rabson,  Mike  Hodel,  Mallory  Geller  and  Jan 
Ridolphi  Geller. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Psychic  readings  tonight  with  Rev.  Gayle  Eaton 
(aka  "Mom")  who  hasn't  been  with  us  since  early 
1979.  Gayle  claims  an  accuracy  rate  of  90%  both 
in  private  and  in  print.  For  you,  the  secret  word 
is  "Mommy."  Then  open  night,  if  time  exists,  un- 
til 5:15  when  Krishnamurti  speaks  on  "Thought." 
From  his  1976  Ojai  talks. 


FRIDAY  MARCH  14 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Grace  Ja- 
cobs on  Seniors  issues.  Read  All  About  It:  Diana 
Martinez  &  Marty  Burton.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  INDEPENDENT  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

Featuring  the  small  labels  and  their  music. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  &  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Weekly  wrap-uf. 

Bill  Hunt,  Dean  Cohen,  Paul  Vangelisti. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Soundboard/  John  Wager-Schneider 

Latin-American  Guitar  (Part  2). Special  guest 
performer  Richard  Stover  will  play,  discuss  and 
illustrate  music  from  Argentina,  Brazil,  Chile, 
Cuba,  etc.  including  many  recordings  unavailable 
in  this  country. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  Soviet  Lives 

Interview  with  psychologist  of  love,  Arctic  explor- 
er, and  a  proofreader  (3  people)  in  Moscow  about 
their  attitudes  toward  war  and  relations  with  the 
US.  English  in  right  channel,  Russian  in  left  at 
lower  volume.  Interview  was  part  of  filming  with 
Oscar-winner  Haskell  Wexler  for  project  of  Center 
for  Defense  Information,  Washington,  headed  by 
Retired  Admiral  Gene  Larocque.  Produced  by 
William  Mandel,  KPFA  Berkeley. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  21 


3:00   AFTERNOON  ASR/  Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  At  3:30, 
American  Indian  Airwaves  with  Liz  Lloyd  and 
guests  from  the  Native  American  activist  communi- 
ty. At  4:00,  you're  //;  Good  Company,  an  unsched- 
uled hour  with  Anita.  At  5:00,  Mediawatch  with 
Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi  and  other  media-watchers. 
At  5:45,  Terry  Model  with  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:00  THE  HEALTH  DEPARTMENT/  Al  Huebner 

Women's  brains  are  smaller  than  men's,  which  is 
exactly  what  you  would  expect,  isn't  it?  Find  out 
about  this  and  other  aspects  of  the  "biology  is 
destiny"  myth  as  we  examine  science  and  sex 
roles  in  the  Victorian  era,  and  now. 

8:00   LE  JAZZ  HOT  &  COOL /John  Breckow 

10:00  HOUR  25:  Science  Fiction 

Hosts  Mike  Model,  Terry  Model  and  John  Henry 
Thong  share  guests,  features,  ideas,  etc. 

12:00  GOODBYE  PORKPIE  HAT/  Paul  Vangellsti 

2:00  NOCTURNAL  TRANSMISSIONS 

Ed  Hammond  invite  you  to 
float  upstream  with  headphones  at  the  ready. 


SATURDAY  MARCH  15 


6:00   MORNING  OF  THE  WORLD/ Lois  VIerk 
7:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

Rebroadcast  from  Tuesday  the  11th,  10:30  p.m. 

8:30  THE  NIXON  TAPES/  Tom  Nixon 

9:30   HALFWAY  DOWN  THE  STAIRS/  Ruth  Buell 

Stories,  music  and  ideas  for  kids  of  all  ages. 

10:30  FOLK  MUSIC/  John  Davis 

12:25  WEEKEND  CALENDAR/  Terry  Hodel 

12:35  THE  CAR  SHOW/  Len  Frank,  John  Retsek 

2:00  BALLADS,  BANJOS  &  BLUEGRASS/  Tom  Sauber 

3:00  WE  CALL  IT  MUSIC/  Tom  Halladay,  Jim  Seeley 

4:00  JAZZ  OMNIBUS/  Ron  Pelletier 

5:30   EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish  features 

6:00  THE  SATURDAY  NEWS/  Larry  Moss 

6:30  ON  FILM/  Dean  Cohen 

6:45  ON  STAGE/  Lawrence  Christon 

7:00  THE  PERFECT  CRIME/ Mike  Hodel 

8:00  THE  WILLIAM  MALLOCH  PROGRAMME 

10:00  IMAGINARY  LANDSCAPE 

Two  percussion  sextets  of  radically  different  na- 
tures. First  by  Iannis  Xenakis,  h\s  Persephassa, 
performed  by  Les  Percussions  de  Strasbourg;  then 
by  George  Gruntz,  his  Percussion  Profiles,  with  an 
ensemble  featuring  Jack  DeJohnette,  Pierre  Favre, 
Fredy  Studer,  Dom  Um  Romao,  David  Friedman 
and  George  Gruntz.  Carl  Stone  hosts.  Stereo. 

12:00  TESSERACT/  Phil  Mendelson 

Contemporary  and  electronic  music. 

2:00   HEPCATS  FROM  HELL/  Richard  Meltzer 


SUNDAY  MARCH  16 


6:00  GOSPEL  CARAVAN/ Prince  Dixon 

9:00  BIO-COSMOLOGY/ Jack  Gariss 

11:00  DOROTHY  HEALEY:  Marxist  Commentary 

12:00  MANY  WORLDS  OF  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

1:00  THE  SUNDAY  OPERA/  Fred  Hyatt 

MASSENET:  Don  Quichotte.  Regine  Crespin,  so- 
prano; Gabi-iel  Bacquier,  baritone;  Nicolai  Ghiaur- 
ov,  bass.  L'Orchestre  de  la  Suisse  Romande  and 
the  Chorus  of  the  Radio  Suisse  Romande  are 
conducted  by  Kazimierz  Kord.  London  OSA  13134. 

5:00  THE  SOUR  APPLE  TREE/ Clare  Spark 

The  arts  and  politics. 

6:00  THE  SUNDAY  NEWS:  Thomas,  Warren,  Johnson 
6:30  THE  SCIENCE  CONNECTION/  Steve,  Vera  Kilston 
7:00  PREACHING  THE  BLUES/ Mary  Aldin 

8:30  IMRU/  The  Gay  Radio  Collective 

Features,  guests,  music  for  the  Gay  community. 
Also,  the  regular  IMRU  Calendar  &  announcements. 

9:30   FOLKSCENE/The  Larmans 

Live  and  recorded  folk  music  from  America,  France, 
the  Commonwealth  countries,  elsewhere.  With  per- 
former interviews. 

12:00  SMOKE  RINGS/ John  Breckow,  Jay  Green 
Jazz  and  conversation  til  morning. 


■**.  tf-v"  ^y^ 


MONDAY,  MAffcH  17: 
Robin  Williamson  participates 
in  special  Irish  programming. 


M. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  22 


Boys  of  the  Lough 


Dr.  Dennis  Clark 


Mick  Moloney  I 


MONDAY  MARCH  17 


A  DAY  OF  CELTIC  CVhTVRE 


As  the  Irish  community  around  the  world  celebrates  St. 
Patrick's  Day,  KPFK  will  present  a  day  of  Celtic  Culture 
with  special  emphasis  on  the  contributions  of  Irish  music- 
ians, playwrights,  and  poets. 

Our  thanks  to  Mick  Moloney,  Padralgin  Maglllicudy,  Shay 
Duff  in.  Bill  Hunt,  and  Janet  &  Robin  Williamson.  A  Day 
of  Celtic  Culture  was  produced  by  Roz  and  Howard  Larman. 

6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT 

9:00   THIS  MORNING 

The  regular  morning  news,  with  Read  All  About  It 
featuring  articles  from  the  Irish  press. 

10:00  THE  BOYS  OF  THE  LOUGH:  recorded  in  concert 

Recorded  live  at  the  1976  San  Diego  Folk  Festival. 
Engineering  by  Alan  Kanter.  Cathal  McConnel  and 
Robin  Morton  from  Ireland,  Dave  Richardson  from 
England,  and  Aly  Bain  from  the  Shetland  Islands 
perform  traditional  music  from  Ireland,  Scotland 
and  the  Shetland  Islands. 

10:50  DE  DANNAN:  recorded  In  concert 

Recordings  made  at  the  3rd  and  4th  Irish  Folk  festi- 
vlas  in  Germany  (1976  &  77).  Alec  Finn,  Johnny 
McDonagh,  Frankie  Gavin,  Johnny  Moynihan  and 
Charlie  Piggot  are  the  dynamic  group  De  Dannan. 

11:25  THE  HERITAGE  OF  THE  ANCIENT  BARDS 
In  the  Scottish  Borders.  Musician,  novelist,  poet 
and  scholar  Robin  Williamson  narrates  his  mono- 
logue on  Celtic  cultural  development  including 
his  poem  Five  Denials  on  Merlin  s  Grave. 

12:00  SEAN  O'RIADA  AND  THE  CHIEFTAINS 

The  Chieftains  were  an  outgrowth  of  Sean  O'Riada's 
group  Ceoltouri  Chualann.   Musicologist  O'Riada 
was  an  early  advocate  of  reviving  the  older  musical 
traditions,  both  folk  and  the  considerable  body  of 
material  which  lay  fallow  in  manuscripts  and  learned 
collections.  He  assembled  a  group  of  musicians 


who  shared  not  only  his  vision  of  the  vitality  of 
the  music,  but  also  an  unusual  combination  of 
talents,  styles  and  instruments  (from  harpsichord 
to  bagpipes).  You  will  hear  their  music  and  that 
of  the  Chieftains,  as  yvell  as  interviews  with  mem- 
bers of  the  Chieftains,  Paddy  Moloney  and  Derek 
Bell,  done  by  Padraigin  Magillicudy  of  KPFA. 

2:00  THE  PLOUGH  AND  THE  STARS  by  Sean  O'Casey 

This  O'Casey  classic  was  produced  as  a  live  radio 
drama  by  John  Lithgow  and  the  Drama  and  Liter- 
ature Department  of  WBAI,  Pacifica  New  York. 

4:00  WILLIAM  BUTLER  YEATS 

A  collage  of  music  and  poetry.  Bill  Hunt  reads 
the  poetry  of  Yeats. 

5:00   THE  BIRTH  OF  BRAN 

Robin  Williamson  reads  James  Stepliens'  version 
of  a  traditional  Gaelic  tale  of  the  Days  of  Fionn 
MacCumbhail.  The  MacCumbhail  stories  are  com- 
mon to  the  western  highlands  and  Ireland. 

5:20  INTERVIEW  WITH  RON  HUTCHINSON 

Irish  playwright  Hutchinson  is  interviewed  by 
Howard  Larman.  Hutchinson's  play  Says  I  Says 
He  is  currently  playing  at  the  Mark  Taper  Forum. 
It  is  centered  on  the  actions  of  two  Irishmen  in 
the  funloving  setting  of  an  Irish  pub  in  London. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 

7:00  INTERVIEW  WITH  DENNIS  CLARK 

Mick  Moloney,  Irish  musician,  collector  (of  Irish 
music  in  America),  and  scholar  interviews  Dennis 
Clark,  an  historian  specializing  in  the  study  of  Irish 
community  life  in  America.  Dr.  Clark's  latest  books 
are  The  Irish  in  Philadelphia  (Temple  University 
Press)  and  Northern  Ireland  and  the  American  Con- 
science (National  University  Publications). 

8:00   CLANNAD:  recorded  in  concert 

The  five  piece  band  from  Gweedore,  Donegal, 
Ireland  performs  traditional  Irish  music  in  a  deli- 
cate, subtle  style  influenced  by  jazz  and  classical 
forms.  Included  is  a  backstage  interview  with  Pol 
Ni'Braohain  and  his  sister  Maire  O'Braohain.  This 
concert  was  recorded  by  Clannad's  engineer  Nicky 
Ryan  at  McCabe's  in  Santa  Monica,  10/20/79. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  23 


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F.IV1.  Alexander,  Ida  Rolf,  Fritz  Perls  and  Alexander  Lowen. 

Dr.  Feldenkrais  will  offer  workshops  which  present  his  system 
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9:00  SHAY  DUFFIN  AS  BRENDAN  BEHAN 

A  former  neighbor  of  Behan's,  Duffin  spent  five 
years  compiling  the  material  for  his  acclaimed 
portrayal  of  the  Irish  poet.  The  show  ran  for 
three  months  in  Philadelphia,  six  months  off-Broad- 
way, eight  months  in  Chicago,  and  fourteen  months 
in  Hollywood.  It  has  received  the  Los  Angeles  and 
San  Francisco  Drama  Critics'  Awards.   This  perform- 
ance was  recorded  at  the  Cannery  Theater  in  San 
Francisco.  Following  the  show  is  an  interview  with 
Duffin  by  Padraigin  Magillicudy  of  KPFA.  The 
closing  music  comes  from  the  Bothy  Band  record- 
ed live  in  Paris. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Alan  Watts  speaks  on  "World  as  Emptiness"  part  1 
of  4  (see  Eclectica  listing  Tuesday  the  18th  for  de- 
tails). Then  open  night  for  open  programming. 


TUESDAY  MARCH  18 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

HANDEL:  The  Water  Music.  The  Academy  of 
Ancient  Music,  performing  on  original  instru- 
ments, is  conducted  by  Christopher  Hogwood. 
L'Oiseau-Lyre  OSLO  543. 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan  (rebroadcast).  Read  All  About  It:  BJ 
Clark  and  Mike  Leviton.  Calendar:  Terry  Model. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

Folk  music  from  the  British  Isles. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  current  cultural  events 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

At  the  Keyboard/  Leonid  Hambro 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  Alan  Watts 

Part  1  of  a  4-part  seminar,  "World  As  Emptiness." 
Trie  Buddhist  view  of  the  world  as  total  flux, 
containing  nothing  to  grasp  and  no  one  to  grasp 
it.  The  surprises  in  this  apparently  total  nihilism. 
The  rest  of  the  series  will  be  aired  on  Mondays 
at  this  time. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  news,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  Pat  Ben- 
son at  3:30  with  Strawberry  Shortbread,  on  schools. 
At  4:00,  an  unscheduled  feature.  At  4:30,  Barbara 
Cady  with  Dealing.  At  5:00,  Ellen  Stern  Harris 
with  Who's  In  Chargi?  Calendar  at  5:45. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:30  CARLOS  HAGEN  PRESENTS 

Chile:  the  Musical  Signature  of  a  Country. 

There  are  countries  that  are  indelibly  associated 
with  certain  melodies  or  types  of  music.  In  this 
program,  Carlos  focuses  on  Chile  and  illustrates 
a  variety  of  melodies  of  that  country  and  why 
they  have  become  like  the  musical  signature  of 
Chile. 


8:30   BACH  WEEK-ANSBACH  1979 

Concert  of  Bach  organ  music:  Prelude  and  Fugue 
in  G  minor;  Six  Schuhler  Chorales;  Prelude  and 
Fugue  in  G  major;  Sonata  No.  6  in  G  major; 
Passacaglia  in  C  minor.  Edgar  Krapp  at  the  organ 
of  St.  John's  Church  in  Ansbach.  Recorded  by 
Inter  Nationes,  Bonn-Bad,  Godesberg.  Resched- 
uled from  January  10. 

10:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Part  4  of  Radio  Canada  International's  "Environ- 
ment" series  with  Gunnar  Myrdal  speaking  on  "The 
Economics  of  an  Improved  Environment"  (30').  // 
Part  9  of  "The  Incredible  Adventures  of  Jack  Flan- 
ders," "In  the  Land  of  the  Talking  Totems"  from 
ZBS  Media  (watch  out,  part  10  and  \a%l  starts  the 
show  next  week!)  //  Part  3  of  Dr.  Carl  Faber's 
"Depression"  series,  with  "Early  Depression  and 
the  Remembrance  of  Feeling  Well"  (ca  90')  from 
UCLA  Extension.  //  From  Radio  Finland,  two 
stories:  "Christmas  Child"  by  Anni  Swan  (20'), 
for  Christmas  1980  of  course,  and  Sillanpaa's 
"Meek  Heritage"  (15').  //  At  4  a.m.,  Bio-Cosmo- 
logy with  Jack  Gariss. 


WEDNESDAY  MARCH  19 

6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News;  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Jeff  Horton, 
on  school  desegregation.  Read  All  About  It:  Bill 
Sheppard  &  Helene  Rosenbluth.  Calendar;  Terry 
Model. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Theatre  Close-Up/  Ray  Tatar 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT/ John  Wager-Schneider 

HINDEMITH:  Ludus-Tonalis,  Symphonic  Meta- 
morphoses, Octet, 


Perennial  favorite  Dr.  Carl  Faber  on  "Something's  Happening!" 
Listen  after  midnight  for  his  series  on  "Depression: " 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  25 


2:00   ECLECTICA:  Finland/  Fourth  Tower 

From  Radio  Finland:  "The  Deadly  Sin"  by  Jo- 
hannes Linnankoski  (1869-1913),  a  famous  story 
by  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  pro-Finnish  Move- 
ment in  the  early  20th  Century,  an  account  of  a 
writer-turned-farmer  who  works  day  and  night  to 
get  his  new  land  into  condition— then  one  evening 
he  has  a  strange  dream.  Next,  Jack  Flanders  in 
more  trouble,  in  ZBS  Media's  "The  Fourth  Tower 
of  Inverness"  part  4.  A  science-fantasy,  conscious- 
ness satire  mystery  adventure  in  super  stereo. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News  until 
3:15  when  news  commentary  througfi  the  wrong 
end  of  the  telescope  is  provided  by  77?^  Absolute 
Truth.  A  little  whacky  gastronomy  at  3:30,  with 
Ruth  Ziony  in  Ruth's  Kitchen.  Open  time  at  4:00, 
with  Jon  Brower  at  4:30  with  Eye  on  Sports.  At 
5:00,  More  Than  Half  the  Sky  focuses  on  women. 
Terry  Hodel  at  5:45  with  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 
6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 
7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 
7:30  UP  FROM  THE  ASH  GROVE/  Ed  Pearl 

9:00   LOS  ANGELES  THEATER  OF  THE  EAR 

Presents:  "What  of  the  Night,"  by  William  Win- 
tersole,  an  adaptation  of  Djuana  Barnes'  Night- 
wood  (1936),  one  of  the  most  extraordinary  no- 
vels of  the  modernist  era.  As  TS  Eliot  has  written, 
Nightwood  is  the  "great  achievement  of  a  style, 
the  beauty  of  phrasing,  the  brilliance  of  wit  and 
characterization,  and  the  quality  of  horror  and 
doom  very  nearly  related  to  that  of  Elizabethan 
tragedy."  Directed  by  Paul  Vangelisti.  Rebroad- 
cast  from  a  live  performance  February  27. 

10:00  THE  BIG  BROADCAST/  Bobb  Lynes 

Surprise  special  of  the  month! 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

"War  and  Peace"  parts  11  &  12  (of  169),  pages  140- 
160,  read  by  Richard  Avedon  and  Joseph  Heller 
(51').  //  "Lux  Radio  Theater:  Pride  of  the  Marines" 
with  John  Garfield,  Dane  Clark,  Eleanor  Parker 
(rehearsal,  12-31-45,  60').  //  Three  from  "X  Minus 
One,"  (30'  each):  "$1000  A  Plate"  (3-21-56),  "The 
Sense  of  Wonder"  (4-24-56)  and  "Project  Trojan" 
6-19-56).  //  "Lux  Radio  Theater:  A  Tale  of  Two 
Cities"  with  Orson  Welles  (3-26-45,  60').  //  At 
5:30,  part  9  of  ZBS  Media's  "The  Incredible  Ad- 
ventures of  Jack  Flanders:  In  the  Land  of  the  Talk- 
ing Totems." 


THURSDAY  MARCH  20 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

Featured:  SCHOENBERG's  Gu/-/-e//e«/e/-.  Jessye 
Norman,  soprano;  Tatiana  Troyanos,  mezzo; 
James  McCracken,  tenor;  Kim  Scown,  tenor;  Da- 
vid Arnold,  baritone;  Werner  Klemperer,  speaker. 
The  Boston  Symphony  Orchestra  and  Tanglewood 
Festival  Chorus  are  conducted  by  Seiji  Ozawa. 
Philips  6769  038. 


9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan.  Read  All  About  It:  Berger  &  Fonda- 
Bonardi.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

Bluegrass  music  at  its  finest  with  Byron  Berline 
and  the  L.A.  Fiddle  Band. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  &  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR 

Double  Take/  Gretchen  Henkel.  Gretchen  reviews 
a  play  along  with  a  response  from  a  representative 
of  the  play. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Chapel,  Court  &  Countryside  (rebroadcast).  Jo- 
seph Spencer  takes  us  back  through  history  with 
the  often  beautiful  and  sometimes  bizarre  sounds 
of  music  of  our  distant  past. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  The  Big  Broadcast 

Surprise  special  of  the  month,  part  2.  Bobb  Lynes 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

At  3:00,  Billboard,  News,  Your  AngJe  on  the  News. 
3:30,  Inside  L.A.  's  Bob  Pugsley  continues  his  series 
on  City,  Sea  and  Desert.  At  4:00,  Open  Air.  4:30, 
Barbara  Cady's  Dealing.  LA  5  PM  features  a  Solar 
Powered 3/4  Hour  this  week  (first  and  third  Thurs- 
days ;  see  Highlights).  Bobby  Nelson,  J.P.L  Scien- 
tist and  Michele  Pritchard  of  the  Citizens'  Party 
are  our  experts  on  solar  transition.  Open  phones. 
At  5:45,  Terry  Hodel  has  the  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

Bilingual  emphasis. 

7:30    EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish 

8:00   L.A.  IN  FOCUS/  Luis  Torres 

Interviews  and  features  about  the  Southern  Cali- 
fornia arts  and  entertainment  scene,  as  well  as 
local  newsmakers. 

9:00  BOSTON  SYMPHONY:  Live  in  Concert 

BERLIOZ:  The  Damnation  of  Faust.  Julia  Varady, 
mezzo;  Kenneth  Riegel,  tenor;  Paul  Plishka,  bari- 
tone; Douglas  Lawrence,  bass.  With  the  Tangle- 
wood  Festival  Chorus  and  the  Boston  Boys  Choir. 
Seiji  Ozawa  conducts.  William  Pierce  hosts.  Dolby 
A  recorded  (program  subject  to  change).     140'. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Open  phones  and  open  night  as  per  our  regular 
schedule.  At  5:00,  Krishnamurti  speaks  on  "Fear," 
talk  3  of  6  recorded  at  Ojai  in  -1976. 


FRIDAY  MARCH  21 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Lowell 
Ponte,  right-wing  anarchist.  Read  All  About  It: 
Martinez  &  Burton.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  INDEPENDENT  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  26 


11:30  KULCHUR:  Weekly  wrap-up  on  the  arts 

Dean  Cohen,  Bill  Hunt,  Paul  Vangelisti. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Soundboard/  John  Wager-Schneider 

French  Lute  Music.  Performances  by  Toyohiko 
Satoh,  Michael  Schaeffer,  Robert  Spencer,  and 
Hopkinson  Smith. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:    Soviet  Lives 

William  Mandel's  notes  into  his  tape  recorder  im- 
mediately after  visiting  a  collective  farm  in  Arme- 
nia, USSR.  He  describes  unstructured  way  in  which 
he  happened  to  visit  it,  home  and  family  of  chair- 
man, his  earnings,  and  those  of  the  "chief  engineer." 
Produced  at  KPFA  Berkeley. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  Then 
free-form  radio,  //;  Good  Company  until  4:30,  at 
which  time  some  special  company:  a  phoned-in 
edition  of  Report  to  the  Listener,  from  Manager 
Jim  Berland,  currently  attending  a  management- 
training  seminar  at  Harvard  (if  you  please!).  At 
5:00,  Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi  with  Mediawatch, 
looking  at  our  competition  on  the  air,  in  print  and 
on  screen.  At  5:45,  Terry  Hodel  with  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 
6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:00  THE  HEALTH  DEPARTMENT/  Al  Huebner 

The  Human  Connection:  a  program  about  babies, 
mothers,  fathers,  and  the  biology  of  love.  First  of 
a  two-part  program.  Part  2  next  Friday  at  7:00. 

8:00  LE  JAZZ  HOT  &  COOL/ John  Breckow 

10:00  HOUR  25:  Science  Fiction 

John  Henry  Thong,  Mike  Hodel,  Terry  Hodel  host. 

12:00  GOODBYE  PORKPIE  HAT/  Paul  Vangelisti 

2:00  NOCTURNAL  TRANSMISSIONS 

Ed  Hammond 


SATURDAY  MARCH  22 


6:00  MORNING  OF  THE  WORLD/ Lois  Vierk 

From  the  central  African  country  of  Burundi, 
marvelously  vital  music  sung  and  played  on  the 
Ikembe  (thumb  piano),  vertical  flute,  Idingltl  (fid- 
dle), inaga  (eight-stringed  zither),  and  drums. 
Nonesuch  Explorer  Series  H-72057. 

7:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

Rebroadcst  from  Tuesday  the  18th,  10:30  p.m. 

8:30  THE  NIXON  TAPES/  Tom  Nixon 

9:30  HALFWAY  DOWN  THE  STAIRS/  Ruth  Buell 

You  don't  half  to  be  a  kid  to  listen. 

10:30  FOLK  MUSIC/  John  Davis 

12:25  WEEKEND  CALENDAR/  Terry  Hodel 

12:35  THE  CAR  SHOW/ John  Retsek,  Len  Frank 

As  the  wheel  turns,  John  and  Len  try  to  get  you 
out  from  under  the  power  of  your  car  and  your 
friendly  gas  company.  Open  phones. 

2:00  BALLADS,  BANJOS  &  BLUEGRASS/  Tom  Sauber 

3:00  WE  CALL  IT  MUSIC/  Tom  Halladay,  Jim  Seeley 

4:00  JAZZ  OMNIBUS/  Ron  Pelletier 


The  Human  Connection:  a  program  about  babies,  mothers,  fathers, 
and  the  biology  of  love.  Part  1  on  "The  Health  Department,"  7 p.m. 
Friday.  Part  2  next  Friday  at  the  same  time.  Al  Huebner  hosts. 


5:30   EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish  features 

6:00  THE  SATURDAY  NEWS/  Larry  Moss 

6:30  THE  WELL-TEMPERED  WREADER/ Jed  Rasula 

7:00  GARDEN  THEATER  FESTIVAL 

Highlights  from  LA's  own  free  outdoor  cultural 
extravaganza. 

8:00  THE  WILLIAM  MALLOCH  PROGRAMME 

10:00  IMAGINARY  LANDSCAPE 

Jerry  Hunt:  From  The  CANTEGRAL  SEGMENTS 

Hunt  lives  in  Dallas  Texas.  His  Cantegral  Segments 
is  a  continuing  series  of  materials  for  various  mech- 
anical and  electronic  instrument  combinations, 
based  on  a  particular  principal  of  continuing,  over- 
lapping and  overlayering  of  musical  components 
so  that  the  compositional  procedure  can  be  ex- 
posed and  interrelated  to  specific  contexts  of  ges- 
ture and  style.  The  works  we  hear  tonight  are  all 
derived  from  Cantegral  Segments  7,  16,  18,  19  : 
Transform  (Stream)  (1977);  Cantegral  Segment 
18.  17  miQ-ll):Transphalba  (1978);  Volta 
(Kernel)  (1977).  Stereo.  Carl  Stone  hosts. 

12:00  TESSERACT/  Phil  Mendelson 

2:00  HEPCATS  FROM  HELL/  Richard  Meltzer 


SUNDAY  MARCH  23 


6:00  GOSPEL  CARAVAN/  Prince  Dixon 

9:00  BIO-COSMOLOGY/ Jack  Gariss 

11:00  DOROTHY  HEALEY:  Marxist  commentary 

12:00  MANY  WORLDS  OF  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

1:00  THE  SUNDAY  OPERA/  Fred  Hyatt 

DONIZETTI:  Lucrezia  Borgia.   Joan  Sutherland, 
soprano;  Marilyn  Home,  mezzo-soprano;  Giacomo 
Aragall,  tenor;  Ingvar  Wixell,  baritone.  The  Na- 
tional Philharmonic  Orchestra  and  London  Opera 
Chorus  are  conducted  by  Richard  Bonynge.  Lon- 
don OSA  13129. 

5:00  THE  SOUR  APPLE  TREE/  Clare  Spark 

6:00  THE  SUNDAY  NEWS/Sanford  Fidell 

6:30   THE  SCIENCE  CONNECTION/  Vera,  Steve  Kilston 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  27 


The  UCLA  Gagaku  Ensemble  performs  live  from  Studio  Z,  in  tfie 
premiere  concert  of  our  new  "World  Series, "  featuring  art  music 
of  the  world.  You  should  try  to  see  as  well  as  hear  these  concerts. 
The  Japanese  Gagaku  Ensemble  appears  Tuesday  the  25th  at  8:30. 


7:00  PREACHING  THE  BLUES/  Mary  Aldin 
8:30   IMRU/  The  Gay  Radio  Collective 

9:30   FOLKSCENE/ The  Larmans 

Traditional  and  contemporary  folk  music,  with 
live  performances  and  interviews  with  the  artists. 

12:00  SMOKE  RINGS/ John  Breckow,  Jay  Green 


MONDAY  MARCH  24 


6:00 
9:00 


SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

THIS  MORNING 

News;  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Mike  Hall's 
Libertarian  Viewpoint.  Read  All  About  It:  Mahler 
&  Martinez.  Calendar:  Terry  Model. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  and  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  News  &  views  on  the  arts 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Music  of  the  Americas/  John  Wager-Schneider 

Music  by  Myrow:  Songs  from  the  Japanese; 
Reynolds:  Quick  as  the  Mouth  of  Earth,  &  more. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  Alan     Watts 

Part  2  of  the  4-part  seminar  "World  as   Emptiness." 
Rebroadcast  on  Something's  Happening  after  12. 

3:00   AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  Good  company 

Usual  start:  Billboard,  News  &  phone-ins.  At  3:30, 
Will  Kinney  &  Barbara  Spark  with  Organic  Garden- 
ing. Dealing  with  Barbara  Cady  at  4:30,  followed 


at  5:00  with  Ida  Honorof's  Consumer  Awareness. 
Calendar  with  Terry  Model  at  5:45. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late-breaking  features 

7:30  LABOR  SCENE/  Sam  Kushner 

8:00  FAMILY  TREE/  Sylvester  Rivers 

Blacks  in  Antiquity  are  discussed  by  attorney 
Legrand  Clegg  II.  The  talk  was  recorded  2/23 
at  the  Western  States  Black  Research  Center's 
history  seminar. 

8:30  CHAPEL.  COURT  AND  COUNTRYSIDE 

Music  of  one  of  the  lesser-known  masters  of  the 
early  Baroque  in  Germany,  Johann  Hermann 
Scheinn  (1585-1630).  Schein  was  the  Cantor  of 
the  Thomasschule  in  Leibzig  a  century  before 
Bach  held  that  post,  and  was  a  pioneer  in  adapt- 
ing and  integrating  the  new  Italian  Baroque  style 
into  the  music  of  Northern  Germany.  Your  host 
is  Joseph  Spencer  (no.  328). 

10:00  IN  FIDELTIY/  Peter  Sutheim 

A  conversation  with  Tomlinson  Molman  (re- 
broadcast  from  February).  The  doings  and  opin- 
ions of  a  bright  and  influential  audio  engineer, 
Chief  Engineer  of  the  Apt  Corporation,  which 
makes  a  preamp  and  a  power  amplifier,  each 
with  unusual  and  sensible  features.  Taped  dis- 
cussion, follwed  by  open  phones. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Alan  Watts  speaks  on  "World  as  Emptiness,  part  2 
of  4.  Then  open  night  for  open  minds. 


TUESDAY  MARCH  25 


6:00  THE  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

Featured  work:  J.S.  BACH:  Hercules  aufdem 
Scheidewege,  Cantata  BWV  213.  Sheila  Armstrong, 
soprano;  Hertha  Toepper,  contralto;  Theo  Altmey- 
er,  tenor;  Jakob  Staempfli,  bass.  The  Figuralchor  der 
Gedaechtniskirche  Stuttgard  and  Bach-Collegium 
Stuttgard  are  conducted  by  Helmuth  Rilling. 
SDG610  208. 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Charles 
Morgan.  Read  All  About  It:  BJ  Clark  &  Mike 
Leviton.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

Sampler  of  traditional  &  contemporary  folkmusic. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Short  works  of  Djuana  Barnes. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Backstage/ Gil  Laurence 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

At  the  Keyboard/  Leonid  Hambro 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  Margaret  Mead 

The  first  of  many  talks  by  Margaret  Mead;  some 
old,  but  none  out-of-date.  Today,  "Why  Can't 
We  Communicate  with  the  Russians,"  broadcast 
in  the  slot  last  year  and  rebroadcast  by  special 
request  (  39').  Then,  for  communications'  sake, 
a  20'  concert  by  the  Soviet        my  Chorus  and 
Band.  Angel  Melodiya  SR-40078. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  28 


3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  news,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  At  3:30, 
Pat  Benson  on  schools:  Strawberry  Shortbread. 
At  4:30,  Barbara  Cady  with  Dealing.  AT  5:00, 
Ellen  Stern  Harris  asks  Who's  In  Charge?  At 
5:45,  Terry  Model's  Calendar  of  events. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  lat<?  breaking  features 

7:30   CARLOS  HAGEN  PRESENTS 

The  Human  Voice:  How  to  Preserve  It  and  How 
to  Ruin  It.  We  all  seem  to  take  our  voices  for 
granted,  yet  few  realize  that  it  is  a  precious  gift 
and  instrument  easily  ruined.  Dr.  Morton  Cooper 
is  an  outstanding  So.  Calif,  speech  therapist  who 
has  abundantly  written  and  lectured  on  the  sub- 
ject. In  a  conversation  with  Carlos,  he  disucsses 
the  voice  and  the  many  usual  ways  through  which 
people  ruin  it,  what  he  aptly  calls  "vocal  suicide." 
Illustrated  with  some  famous  examples. 

8:30  THE  WORLD  SERIES  -  I 

A  performance  given  live  from  our  studio  Z,  fea- 
turing the  UCLA  Gagaku  Ensemble.  Gagaku  is 
the  oldest  continuous  musical  tradition  in  the 
world.  Existing  in  Japan  since  the  8th  Century, 
this  music  has  traditionally  been  attached  to  the 
Imperial  Court.  The  ensemble  performing  this 
evening  is  from  UCLA,  and  is  led  by  Suenobu 
Togi,  whose  ancestors  have  been  Imperial  Court 
musicians  in  Japan  since  the  8th  Century.  The 
instruments  include  the  hichiriki  (double-reed), 
ryuteki  (flute),  s/70  (mouth  organ),  biwa  (lute), 
koto,  and  others.    A  rare  chance  to  hear  this 
venerable  and  elegant  music,  and  to  watch  it 
being  made.  This  is  the  premiere  concert  of  our 
new  World  Series.  You  are  invited  to  attend,  but 
seating  is  limited.  Phone  213/  877-271 1  for  reser- 
vations, and  plan  to  arrive  by  8:10  p.m.  Produced 
by  Carl  Stone  and  Lois  Vierk. 

10:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Part  10  and  last  of  ZBS  Media's  "The  Incredible 
Adventures  of  Jack  Flanders  starts  off  the  show  with 
"The  Velvet  Realms."  (30')    ZBS  can  be  contacted 
at  RD  1,  Fort  Edward  NY  12828.  Watch  this  spot 
for  "Fourth  Tower  of  Inverness"  (Jack's  first  ad- 
ventures), being  rebroadcast  soon.  //  Part  5  of 
Radio  Canada  International's  "Environment" 
series  with  Carmen  Miro  speaking  on  "Environ- 
mental Conservation:  A  New  Malthusian  Argu- 
ment?" (30').  //  Part  4  of  Carl  Faber's  9-part 
UCLA  Extension  course  on  "Depression:  Deep 
Depression— Hopeless,  Functioning,  and  Fraudu- 
lence"  (ca  90').  //  From  Radio  Finland,  2  stories: 
"The  Eviction"  by  Vaino  Linna  (24')  and  "The 
Wolf"  by  Timo  K.  Mukka  (30').  //  At  4:00,  Jack 
Gariss  with  Bio-Cosmology. 


WEDNESDAY  MARCH  26 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Mike  Leviton. 


Read  All  About  It:  Sheppard  &  Rosenbluth.  Calen- 
dar: Terry  Model. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Works  of  Djuana  Barnes. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Theatre  Close-Up/  Ray  Tatar 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT/  John  Wager-Schneider 

Trombone  Music.  Featuring  performers  Miles 
Anderson  and  Stuart  Dempster,  music  by  Salzedo, 
Castesedo,  Dempster  and  others. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:  Finland/  Fourth  Tower 

From  Radio  Finland:  "First  Love"  by  Joel  Leh- 
tonen  (1881-1934).  Antti,  a  serious,  hard-working 
grammar  school  boy,  finds  his  first  introduction 
to  high  romance  In  a  snake-charming  lady  at  a 
travelling  fair.  Next,  Jack  Flanders  continues  his 
adventures  in  part  5  of  ZBS  Media's  "The  Fourth 
Tower  of  Inverness,  not  to  be  missed  by  radio  fans, 
(about  35'). 

3:05  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

First,  Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News. 
At  3:30,  Ruth  Ziony  presides  in  Ruth's  Kitthen. 
Open  Air  at  4:00.  At  4:30,  Linda  Strawn  watches 
the  people  who  watch  the  future,  on  Futurewatch. 
More  Than  Half  the  Sky  at  5:00,  where  women 
have  some  room  of  their  own  to  talk  together. 
At  5:45,  Terry  Model  offers  the  daily  Calendar. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/ Charles  Morgan 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late  breaking  features 

7:30  UP  FROM  THE  ASH  GROVE/  Ed  Pearl 

9:00  LOS  ANGELES  THEATER  OF  THE  EAR  Presents: 
"Author  /  Actor  Auteur/Acteur  Autore/Attore" 

An  evening  of  experimental  radio  theater  by  some 
of  Europe's  most  interesting  new  writers—  Julien 
Blaine,  Adriano  Spatola,  F.  Tiziano  and  Corrado 
Costa—  featuring  the  authors'  direct  intervention 
in  the  dramatic  experience.  An  evening  to  make 
you  mumble.  Translated  and  directed  by  Paul  Van- 
gelisti.  As  usual,  the  production  will  air  live  before 
an  audience  in  KPFK's  Studio  Z.  Admission  is 
free  but  seating  is  limited.  For  reservations  call 
213/877-271 1  during  business  hours. 

10:00  THE  BIG  BROADCAST/  Bobb  Lynes 

Bing  Crosby  (5/7/47)  and  George  Gershwin 
Tribute  (7/4/42). 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

"War  and  Peace"  parts  13  &  14,  pages  160-166, 
read  by  Thomas  Stewart  and  Diane  Serber  (32').  // 
Jack  Kerouac  reads  some  Jack  Kerouac  (ca  30').  // 
"Luther"  by  John  Osborne,  starring  Stacy  Keach, 
with  Alan  Badel,  Judy  Dench,  Hugh  Griffith,  Pa- 
trick Magee  and  Robert  Stephens  (1 :45'),  Caed- 
mon  TRS  363.  //  "Lux  Radio  Theatre:  Lost  An- 
gel" starring  Margaret  O'Brien  (nd,  60').  //  Two 
from  the  "l^avorite  Story"  series:  "Alice  in  Won- 
derland" with  Dawn  Bender,  Lauresn  Turtle  and 
June  Foray,  and  "The  Man  who  Married  a  Dumb 
Wife"  with  Ronald  Colman,  Bea  Benadaret  and 
Peter  Ranken  (30'  each).  //  The  last  chapter  of 
ZBS  Media's  "The  Incredible  Adventures  of  Jack    , 
Flanders"  next  week  at  this  time. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  29 


THURSDAY  MARCH  27 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

Featured:  POULENC's  Concert  Champetre  for 
Harpsichord  and  Orchestra.  George  Malcolm, 
harpsichord,  lona  Browti  conducts  the  Academy 
of  St.  Martin-in-theFields.  Argo  ZRG  878. 

9:00   THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Morgan. 
Read  All  About  It:  Berger  &  Fonda-Bonardi. 
Calendar:  Terry  Model. 

10:00  FOLKSCENE/  The  Larmans 

English  ballad  singer -guitarist  Martin  Carthy. 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels. 

11:30  KULCHUR 

Neal  Spiegel,  rSviewer-at-large,  on  the  loose  again. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Chapel,  Court  and  Countryside/ Joseph  Spencer 

Rebroadcasts  of  evening  editions  of  early  music 
program. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  The  Big  Broadcast 

Two  quiz  shows:  "20  Questions"  from  3/10/46; 
"Information  Please"  from  12/19/'19.  Bobb 
Lynes  hosts. 

3:00   AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard.  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  At  3:15, 
Grace  Jacobs'  Speaking  of  Seniors.  3:30,  unsched- 
uled feature.  4:30,  Barbara  Cady  does  Dealing.  On 
LA  5  PM,  Anita  hosts  topical  guests  and  call-ins. 
Calendar  at  5:45,  with  Terry  Model. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  OPEN  JOURNAL:  late-breaking  features  (bilingual) 

7:30   EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish 

8:00  L.A.  IN  FOCUS/  Luis  Torres 

Interviews  &  features  on  arts,  entertainment 
and  newsmakers  around  the  LA  area. 

9:00  BOSTON  SYMPHONY:  Live  in  Concert 

BEETHOVEN:  Symphony  No.  Sin  C minor; 
RAVEL:  Pavane  for  a  Dead  Princess;  Sheherazade; 
Bolero.  Frederica  von  Stade,  mezzo.  Seiji  Ozawa 
conducts.  William  Pierce  hosts.  Dolby  A  recorded, 
program  subject  to  change. 

11:00  JANUS  COMAPNY  RADIO  THEATRE 

For  most  of  their  lives  they  had  been  mute.  Now, 
by  decree,  they  must  forsake  their  "Vow  of  Si- 
lence," a  new  radio  play  by  Mallory  and  Jan 
Geller.  LIVE! 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Open  phone  night  for  end-of-the-month  going  out 
like  a  lamb  communications.  Then  open  program- 
ming if  time  allows  until  5:10  when  Krishnamurti 
speaks  on  "Pleasure  and  Sorrow,"  the  4th  of  6 
Ojai  talks. 


FRIDAY  MARCH  28 


6:00  SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 


9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Commentary:  Grace  Ja- 
cobs on  Seniors  issues.  Read  All  About  It:  Marti- 
nez &  Burton.  Calendar;  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  INDEPENDENT  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

Selections  from  feminist  novels,  past  and  present. 

11:30  KULCHUR:  Weekly  wrap-up 

Paul  Vangelisti,  Bill  Hunt,  Dean  Cohen  host. 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT 

Soundboard/  John  Wager-Schneider 

SEGOVIA/BOBRI:  a  show  featuring  the  voices 
of  Segovia  and  some  of  his  early  recordings,  and 
an  interview  with  his  old-time  friend  Vladimir 
Bobri,  artist.  President  of  the  New  York  Guitar 
Society,  Editor  of  Guitar  Review. 

2:00   ECLECTICA:    Soviet  Lives 

Interview  by  Tanya  and  William  Mandel  with  Abra- 
ham Gontar,  who  has  had  1 1  books  of  his  Yiddish- 
language  poetry  published  in  the  Soviet  Union 
(1933-1977),  plus  four  books  of  translations  of 
his  poems  into  Russian.  They  discuss  and  argue 
vehemently  about  availability  of  instruction  in 
the  Yiddish  languages,  courses  in  Jewish  history 
and  anthropological  study  of  the  Jewish  people 
in  the  USSR.  Produced  by  William  Mandel  for 
KPFA  Berkeley. 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News.  At  3:30, 
Liz  Lloyd  and  guests  offer  American  Indian  Air- 
waves. At  4:00,  In  Good  Company  has  unscheduled 
features  until  5:00  when  Claudia  Fonda-Bonardi 
and  guests  take  up  Mediawatch.  Calendar  at  5:45. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45   OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

7:00  THE  HEALTH  DEPARTMENT/ Al  Huebner 

The  Human  Connection,  part  2.  Aboutbabies, 
mothers,  fathers,  love,  and  the  biology  of  love. 

8:00  LE  JAZZ  HOT  &  COOL/  John  Breckow 

10:00  HOUR  25:  Science  Fiction 

Terry  Hodel,  John  Henry  Thong,  Mike  Hodel  host. 

12:00  GOODBYE  PORKPIE  HAT/  Paul  Vangelisti 

2:00  NOCTURNAL  TRANSMISSIONS 
Ed  Hammond 


SATURDAY  MARCH  29 

6:00  MORNING  OF  THE  WORLD/ Lois  Vierk 

Rebroadcast  of  the  Gagaku  and  Bugaku  concert 
(Japanese  Court  Music  and  Dance)  heard  live  from 
KPFK's  Studios  on  March  25. 

7:30  MUSIC  OF  SOUTH  ASIA/  Harihar  Rao 

8:30  THE  NIXON  TAPES/  Tom  Nixon 

9:30  HALFWAY  DOWN  THE  STAIRS/  Ruth  Buell 

10:30  FOLK   MUSIC/ John  Davis 

12:25  WEEKEND  CALENDAR/  Terry  Hodel 

12:35  THE  CAR  SHOW/  Len  Frank,  John  Retsek 

2:00   BALLADS,  BANJOS  &  BLUEGRASS  /  Tom  Sauber 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  30 


3:00  WE  CALL  IT  MUSIC/  Jim  Seeley,  Tom  Halladay 

4:00  JAZZ  OMNIBUS/  Ron  Pelletier 

5:30  EN  FOQUE  NACIONAL:  Spanish  features 

6:00  THE  SATURDAY  NEWS/  Larry  Moss 

6:30  ON  FILM/  Dean  Cohen 

6:45  ON  STAGE/  Lawrence  Christen 

7:00   OPEN  TIME 

8:00  THE  WILLIAM  MALLOCH  PROGRAMME 

10:00  IMAGINARY  LANDSCAPE 

Italian  Sound  Poetry,  presented  by  Cultural 
Affairs  Director  Paul  Vangellsti. 

12:00  TESSERACT/  Phil  Mendelson 

2:00  HEPCATS  FROM  HELL/  Richard  Meltzer 


SUNDAY  MARCH  30 


6:00  GOSPEL  CARAVAN/  Prince  Dixon 

9:00  BIO-COSMOLOGY/ Jack  Gariss 

An  organic  synthesis  of  the  micro-sensitivity  of 
science  and  the  holistic  perception  of  unitive 
consciousness. 

11:00  DOROTHY  HEALEY:  Marxist  commentary 

With  activist  guests  and  open  phones. 

12:00  MANY  WORLDS  OF  MUSIC/  Mario  Casetta 

1:00  TENOR  OF  THE  TIMES 

Fred  Hyatt  re-celebrates  the  joys  of  the  legendary 
Danish  tenor  of  yore,  Helge  Roswaenge. 

1:30  THE  SUNDAY  OPERA/  Fred  Hyatt 

MOZART:  The  Magic  Flute.  Tiana  Lemnitz, 
Erna  Berger,  sopranos;  Helge  Roswaenge,  tenor; 
Wilhelm  Strienz,  bass.  The  Berlin  Philharmonic 
and  Chorus  ara  conducted  by  Sir  Thomas  Bee- 
Cham.  Turnabout  TV  41 11-13. 

5:00  THE  SOUR  APPLE  TREE/  Clare  Spark 

6:00  THE  SUNDAY  NEWS/  Johnson,  Warren,  at  al 

6:30  THE  SCIENCE  CONNECTION/  Kilstons 

What  are  the  scientists  doing  with  our  lives  these 
days?  And  is  that  good  or  bad?  Open  phones. 

7:00  PREACHING  THE  BLUES/ Mary  Aldin 

8:30  IMRU/  The  Gay  Radio  Collective 

News,  announcements,  features,  music,  guests, 
open  phones,  for  and  by  Gay  men  and  Lesbians. 

9:30    FOLKSCENE/The  Larmans 

Traditional  and  contemporary  folk  music,  both 
live  and  recorded,  with  artist-interviews. 

12:00  SMOKE  RINGS/  John  Breckow,  Jay  Green 


MONDAY  MARCH  31 


6:00   SUNRISE  CONCERT/  Carl  Stone 

9:00  THIS  MORNING 

News:  Diana  Martinez.  Read  All  About  It:  Mahler 
&  Martinez.  Calendar:  Terry  Hodel. 

10:00  FOLKDANCE  WITH  MARIO! 

11:00  THE  MORNING  READING 

11:30  KULCHUR:  News  &  views  on  the  arts 

12:00  NOON  CONCERT      , 

Music  of  the  Americas/  John  Wager-Schneider 

George  CRUMB:  Music  for  a  Summer  Evening; 
William  BOLCOM:  Frescoes  for  keyboards. 

2:00  ECLECTICA:  Alan  Watts 

Part  3  of  "World  as  Emptiness"  (rebroadcast  on 
Something's  Happening  after  midnight). 

3:00  AFTERNOON  AIR/Anita  Frankel  in  good  company 

Billboard,  News,  Your  Angle  on  the  News  'til  3:30. 
Will  Kinney  and  Barbara  Spark  at  3:30  with  Organ- 
ic Gardening.  Dealing  at  4:30  with  Barbara  Cady. 
At  5:00,  a  health  professional  will  be  Anita's  guest, 
with  open  phones  on  Open  Air  for  your  Health. 
Calendar  at  5:45  with  Terry  Hodel. 

6:00  THE  EVENING  NEWS/  Richard  Mahler 

6:45  COMMENTARY/  Charles  Morgan 

7:00  OPEN  JOURNAL:  Late  breaking  features 

7:30   LABOR  SCENE/ Sam  Kushner 

8:00    FAMILY  TREE/ Sylvester  Rivers 

The  direction  and  future  of  the  Black  people  will 
be  discussed  by  Dr.  Ernest  Smith. 

8:30  CHAPEL,  COURT  AND  COUNTRYSIDE 

Joseph  Spencer  hosts  a  program  of  English  music 
from  the  16th  and  17th  Centuries,  featuring  cho- 
ral music  by  John  Sheppard  and  Thomas  Tomkins, 
and  instrumental  music  by  William  Williams,  John 
Hilton,  Henry  Purcell  and  others  (329). 

10:00  IN  FIDELITY/  Petej-  Sutheim 

On  the  eve  of  Peter's  favorite  day  of  the  year,  a 
cleansingly  detached  view  of  audiophilia  and  the 
nutty  industry  it  has  spawned.  Some  repeats  from 
last  year,  by  popular  apathy,  and  some  new  horrors. 

11:30  LATE  NIGHT  NEWS 

12:00  SOMETHING'S  HAPPENING!/  Roy  of  Hollywood 

Alan  Watts  speaks  on  "World  as  Emptiness  part  3  of 
4,  from  MEA  (Box  303,  Sausalito  94965).  Then, 
end-of-the-month  ritual  open  night. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  31 


When  you  patronize  our 
advertisers,  please  tell  them 
you  saw  their  ad  in  the  Folio! 


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to  spend  their  advertising  dollars  with  the  Folio,  It 
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again.  Advertising  can  make  the  Folio  self-sufficient, 
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fine  radio  prcjgrams.  Thanks  for  your  help. 


For  Worl< -Connected  Injuries  or  Illnesses 

Jerold  L.  Perry 

Certified  Specialist, 

Workers'  Connpensation  Law, 

California  Board  of  Legal  Specialization 

Reich,  Adell,  Crost  &  Perry 

A  Professional  Law  Corporation 


501  Shatto  Place 
Suite  100 

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Need  a  Stereo  Doctor 
Who  Makes  Housecalls? 

That  buzz  in  your  speaker  may  come 
from  your  turntable.  A  w^hole-system 
diagnosis  finds  it  faster  than  trips  to 
the  repair  shop,  piece  by  piece. 
Give  us  a  call. 

Peter  Sutheim's  I 

earworks 

PRIVATE  AUDIO  PRACTICE 
(213)  255-2425 


Thanks  to 
Lawrence  McManus 
for  sending  us  this: 


I      KNOW   JESUS   CHRIST   SAID  TURN  THE  OTHER   CHEEK, 
BUT   THAT'S    NOT  WHAT   HE   .REALLY  ^i;AKT.      NOW   LET'S 
GET   ON  WITH  THIS    TROOP  BUILD  UP   AND  SHOW  THE 
SOVIETS   THAT    a'S  MAN  BUSiraSS. 

I   KNOW  JESUS   CHRIST   SAID   LOVE  THY   EKE>iY ,    BUT 
THAT'S    NOT   WHAT    HE   REALLY  f-ilANT .      NOW   LET'S 
GET   ON  WITH   THIS   TROOP   BUILD  UP   AND  SHOW  THE 
SOVIETS   THAT  WE  .KEAN   EUSIHESS. 

I    KNOW  JESUS   CHRIST   SAID  VENGEANCE   IS   MINE 
ALONE,    BUT  THAT'S    NOT   WHAT   HE   .REALLY  f-iEANT. 
HOW   LET'S   GET   ON  WITH  THIS   TROOP  BUILD  UP   AND 
SHOW  THE  SOVIETS   THAT  WE  .^£AN  BUSINE:;S, 

I    KNOW   JESUS   CHRIST   SAID  THOU   SHALT   NOT   KILL, 

BUT   THAT'S   NOT  WHAT   hi)   REALLY  MEANT.      NOW   LET'S 
GET   ON  WITH  THIS   TROOP  BUILD  UP   AND  SHOW  THE 
SOVIETS   THAT  ',»E  ^AN  BUSINESS. 

I    KNOW   JESiJS   CHRIST   SAID   DO   UNTO   OTHERS    AS   YOU 
WOULD   HAVE   THEM  DO   UNTO   YOU,    BUT  THaT'S    t;OT  WHAT 
HE   .REALLY   t'EANT.      NOW   LET'S   GET   ON  WITH   THIS 
TR00°  BUILD  UP   AND  SHOW  THE  SOVIETS   THAT  WE 
y£AN  BUSINESS. 


THE    JRFAT  KODERN   CHRISTIAN   ANxRICAN   ETHIC: 


/V\i^w^iJ2'  (Q  \<^8>o 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  32 


TRANSITION  TO  SOLAR 
Continued  from  page  1 1. 


efficiency  of  over  90%,  producing  both  heat  and  electricity 
at  the  price  it  now  costs  to  produce /wsf  heat.  And,  as  solar 
methane  gas  (produced  from  garbage,  agricultural  residues 
and  grain)  is  developed,  it  can  be  gradually  introduced  into 
the  existing  natural  gas  pipelines  to  power  the  cogenerators. 
In  addition  to  the  obvious  energy  and  economic  savings, 
one  of  the  sad  ironies  of  the  current  energy  situation  is  that 
Chrysler  workers  who  face  devastating  unemployment  could 
be  readily  engaged  in  manufacturing  cogeneration  units  for 
the  domestic  market. 

As  our  second  step  in  implementing  the  solar  transition,  let 
us  further  reduce  natural  gas  demand  through  the  installa- 
tion of  various  solar  technologies.  One  way  to  do  this  is  with 
a  simple  device  called  a  flat  plate  solar  collector  mounted 
on  home  rooftops.  The  collector  traps  sunlight  behind  a 
glass  plate  and  converts  it  to  thermal  energy.  This  then  heats 
water  circulating  behind  the  glass  panel.  This  hot  water  is 
then  transferred  to  a  storage  tank  and  is  subsequently  used 
as  a  source  of  space  heat  and  hot  water.  In  order  to  supply 
50%  of  the  heat  and  hot  water  of  a  typical  Southern  Cali- 
fornia home,  a  10  x  10  foot  square  rooftop  collector  and  a 
100-gallon  storage  tank  would  be  required.  This  simple  tech- 
nology, if  widely  used,  could  drastically  reduce  natural  gas 
demand  and  completely  eliminate  the  need  to  import  ex- 
pensive and  dangerous  liquified  natural  gas  (LNG),  as  is  pro- 
posed for  Point  Conception  in  California. 

CAN  WE  AFFORD  IT? 

At  this  early  point  in  our  scenario,  however,  we  confront  a 
serious  problem.  As  attractive  as  flat  plate  collectors  and  co- 
generators  seem,  the  demand  for  these  products  is  low  be- 
cause they  are  expensive.  A  flat  plate  solar  collector  instal- 
lation costs  about  $5,000  for  a  single  home,  while  the  co- 
generation  unit  referred  to  costs  roughly  $3,000.  California's 
55%  solar  tax  credit  was  established  to  provide  an  incentive 
to  homeowners  to  take  the  first  solar  step,  and  has  in  fact 
assisted  solar  development  to  some  extent.  But  a  recently 
published  first-year  evaluation  of  the  solar  tax  credit  pro- 
gram has  underscored  the  difficulties  of  such  an  approach: 
over  70%  of  the  tax  credits  were  used  for  active  swimming 
pool  heating  systems;  more  than  half  of  the  claims  were  filed 
by  taxpayers  in  the  $20,000  to  40,000  income  bracket;  and 
the  State  of  California  lost  $10.5  million  in  tax  revenues— 
a  significant  sum  in  light  of  Proposition  13  constraints  on 
much-needed  social  services.  The  problem  here  is  that 
wealthy  homeowners  enjoy  the  economic  benefits  of  in- 
creased energy  savings,  but  poor  and  middle-income  families 
who  can't  afford  the  investment  continue  to  pay  higher  and 
higher  energy  prices.  Renters,  of  course,  can't  participate  in 
such  a  program  either,  unless  they  plan  to  re-install  their  so- 
lar collector  each  time  they  move.  Ironically,  poor  and  mo- 
dest income  families  and  renters  who  are  irtost  in  need  of 
relief  from  high  energy  prices  have  been  made  to  indirectly 
subsidize  solar  installations  for  the  rich. 

A  more  equitable  approach  would  be  the  direct  financing 
of  solar  installations  through  public  funds  to  reduce  energy 
consumption.  Taxation  of  energy  industry  profits,  or  a  trans- 


fer of  public  monies  now  devoted  to  nuclear  power  and  LNG 
development  would  be  ways  to  provide  the  large  capital  as- 
sets needed  for  the  solar  transition.  Such  a  program  could 
feasibly  make  available  a  low-interest,  revolving  loan  fund; 
could  subsidize  mas  transit,  community  solar  conversion 
and  development  projects;  or  could  be  invested  in  the  direct 
manufacturing  of  reliable,  low-cost  solar  equipment.  Similar- 
ly, the  implementation  of  cogeneration  would  require  a  re- 
structuring of  electric  utility  rates  which  now  mandate  high 
stand-by  and  buy-back  costs  for  customers  generating  part 
or  all  of  their  own  electric  needs.  If  gas  and  electric  utilities 
were  to  pursue  aggressive  cogeneration  and  solarization  pro- 
grams, many  proposed  coal,  nuclear  and  synthetic  fuel  plants 
would  become  unnecessary.  Concepts  such  as  these  would 
begin  to  make  solar  technology  available  to  those  who  need 
it  most  and  would  probably  assure  a  more  rapid  penetration 
of  solar  into  the  fossil  fuel  market.  Implementation,  how- 
ever, will  depend  upon  a  strong  public  initiative,  concerned 
with  the  social  necessity  of  a  solar  transition,  rather  than  its 
profitability. 


PHOTOVOLTAIC  CELLS 

Our  next  step  in  the  solar  transition  would  probably  involve 
the  photovoltaic  cell  or  solar  cell.  These  devices,  first  de- 
veloped by  NASA  for  space  applications,  convert  sunlight 
directly  into  electricity.  Arrays  of  these  devices  mounted 
on  home  roofs  can  provide  more  than  enough  electricy  for 
residential  use.  They  are  currently  about  8%  efficient,  but 
reasonable  projections  estimate  that  this  can  be  almost  dou- 
bled in  the  next  decade. 

Solar  cells,  however,  only  make  electricity  when  the  sun 
shines,  an  obvious  problem  since  electricity  is  needed  in  the 
nome  after  dark.  Our  next  solar  step  would  then  entail  the 
sharing  of  electricity  through  a  national  or  regional  power 
grid.  For  example,  excess  electricity  produced  from  photo- 
voltaics  in  sunny,  Southern  California  during  the  day  could 
be  sent  to  the  cloudy  Northwest.  This  would  save  the  abun- 
dant hydroelectric  power  of  the  Northwest  until  after  dark 
when  it  can  then  be  shared  with  the  South.  This  obviously 
requires  extensive  public  planning  and  a  well-coordinated 
development  program,  something  antithetical  to  the  hap»- 
hazard  and  piecemeal  approach  of  the  free  market. 

Solar  cells,  like  other  solar  technologies,  are  also  extremely 
expensive.  Since  the  late  1950s,  the  price  has  fallen  almost 
a  thousand-fold,  yet  they  are  still  not  economically  compe- 
titive with  other  electrical  sources.  The  fundamental  prob- 
lem here  is  that  the  introduction  of  mass  production  tech- 
niques which  would  greatly  drop  the  cost  of  the  cells  de- 
pends on  the  development  of  a  market  (or  demand).  A  study 
by  the  Federal  Energy  Administration  (FEA)  in  1977  con- 
cluded that  the  cost  of  photovoltaics  could  be  driven  down 
by  large  government  purchases  at  current  prices  in  order  to 
stimulate  the  market.  The  FEA  study  estimated  that  a 
$440  million  purchase  of  photovoltaics  would  cause  rapid 
expansion  of  the  industry  and  drive  prices  down  to  competi- 
tive levels  by  1983.  Congress,  under  the  influence  of  this  stu- 
dy, approved  a  $90  million  solar  cell  purchase  provision  in 
the  1978  Energy  Act.  President  Carter  signed  the  bill,  but 
has  refused  to  spend  the  money.  As  a  result,  photovoltaics 
will  not  become  economically  competitive  until  after  1987. 
This  delay  is  extremely  serious  and  further  demonstrates  the 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  33 


SOLAR  TRANSITION 


Continued  from  page  33. 


fact  that  out  energy  situation  is  not  so  much  a  technology 
problem  as  a  political  one. 

A  POLITICAL  PROBLEM 

Here  we  have  only  begun  to  scratch  the  surface  of  a  few  of 
the  problems  involved  in  a  solar  transition.  The  important 
point  is  that  a  solar-based  energy  economy  will  only  occur 
rapidly  and  equitably  through  strong  and  aggressive  public 
programs  under  the  direction  of  concerned  citizens,  labor 
unions  and  representatives  of  the  poor  and  renters.  After  all, 
these  are  the  poeple  who  stand  to  gain  from  the  solar  transi- 
tion, as  compared  to  the  oil  companies  and  electric  utilities 
wedded  to  the  continued  production  of  fossil  fuel,  nuclear 
energy  and  staggering  profits.  As  individuals,  there  are  a  few 
small  steps  that  can  be  taken:  home  insulation,  close  moni- 
toring of  thermostats,  and  flat  plate  collectors  are  all  good 
ideas  (if  you  are  among  the  few  who  can  afford  them).  But 
the  real  benefits  of  a  solar  transition  will  not  occur  by  indi- 
viduals acting  alone.  The  effective  integration  of  various  so- 
lar technologies  and  the  development  of  energy  self-sufficien- 
cy requires  that  the  entire  energy  industry  be  placed  under 
close  public  control.  The  solar  strategy  briefly  outlined  here 
presents  a  fundamental  challenge  to  existing  privatized  me- 
thods of  energy  production,  distribution  and  utilization. 
And  it  is  ultimately  on  the  political  terrain  where  our  main 
efforts  must  take  place. 


A  young  woman  from  "Live  Wires"  sang  us  a  telegram  not  too  long  ago,  right  smack  in  the  middle  of  a  Staff  Meeting! 
Imagine  our  surprise  when  she  burst  into  song  (to  the  tune  of  "Moonlight  Cocktails,"  some  claim)  to  express  the  thanks 
of  the  Alliance  for  Survival  for  KPFK's  coverage  of  the  anti-nuclear  movement.  Lest  you  worry  that  the  Alliance  has 
gone  bonkers  with  your  donations,  be  assured  that  the  telegram  was  donated  by  "Live  Wires."  Here's  what  it  looks  like. 


From 


To 


The  Singing  Telegram  People ...  By  foot  or  by  phone. 


DOIiATEi.    FROM    LIV2    ■•'IRES    FOR    THE     ■.Li.JANCi;    FOR    SURV1^RT, 


JIM  BERLAND  &  STAFF 


OUR  THANKS  FOR  YOUR  HELP  IN  THIS  PAST  YEAR  1979. 

THE  ALLIANCE  FOR  SURVIVAL  HAS  ENJOYED  iORKING  WITH  YOU. 

WE  LOOK  FORWARD  TO  THE  FUTURE-TO  1980-TO  AN  ONGOING 

RELATIONSHIP  WITH  YOU-PROVIDING  EYES  AND  EARS  FOR  THE 

AKTI-NUCLEAR  M'  VEMENT  HERE  IN  SOUTHERN  CALIFOR\^IA 

TO  THE  GENERAL  PUBLIC. 


A    BIG   THANKS!  !:.!!!!! 


,«y^^^<i.gi>>y^:_^^^b'^?&'^ 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  34 


KPFK  Feedback 

Hi,  just  let  me  congratulate  you  all,  staff  and  volunteers, 
for  the  wonderful  broadcasting  you  provide.  I  appreciate 
the  opportunity  to  comment.  You  may  reply  or  reprint 
as  you  like.  1 )  Who  is  reading  this?  Is  there  a  designated 
regular  Feedback  reader?  2)  Folio  editor— the  Folio  is  real 
nice  as  Is:  not  too  big  and  primarliy  a  readable  program 
guide.  I  like  a  bit  of  deeper  program  information  and  some 
letters.  And,  I  really  dig  photos  of  the  staff  and  volunteers. 
I  enjoy  the  other  photos  too.  3)  How  about  changing  the 
name  "Nixon  Tapes"  to  something  else.  Can't  we  get  that 
name  out  of  our  minds  please?.  .  .  4)  Gay  and  Lesbian  is- 
sues are  such  a  bore.  How  about  a  civil  liberties  program 
which  deals  with  all  human  rights  issues  in  our  communi- 
ty. This  would  entail  dealing  with  homosexual  rights,  but 
within  a  more  meaningful  context.  .  .  .5)  I  feel  the  station 
does  not  emphasize  enough  its  listener  sponsorship.  I  sug- 
gest iinef  station  pitches  and  invitations  to  join.  .  .  peri- 
odically during  all  hours.  It  is  possible,  during  non-marathon 
periods,  for  someone  to  listen  to  KPFK  a  lot  and  never  re- 
alize how  the  station  works  and  how  to  subscribe.  .  .  . 

Dan  Heagney,  Laguna  Beach 

1)  The  phone-people  sort  the  mail,  and  then  letters  are 
passed  around  to  all  the  appropriate  people  named  with- 
in. I  (Folio  Editor)  get  most  of  the  letters  addressed  to 
"Feedback,  "read  them,  and  pass  them  along.  ALL  letters 
eventually  end  up  in  the  Manager's  letters  file,  and  then 
jim  and  I  choose  the  few  that  end  up  in  the  Folio,  taking 
note  of  specific  letters  brought  to  our  attention  by  other 
staff  people.  We  try  to  choose  representative  opinions,  but 
try  to  avoid  straight  "fan"  mail  ("I  just  love  everything.  .  .  "). 

2)  Thanks  for  liking  the  Folio,  I  agree  about  the  sad  lack 
of  deeper  programming  information.  I  work  on  that  all 
the  time,  but  most  programmers  regard  the  Folio  as  some- 
what secondary  in  importance!  A  nd  besides,  the  deadline 
is  so  early!  And  it  stifles  spontaneity!  Keep  those  cards 
and  letters  coming  in,  folks,  and  we  'II  get  that  program- 
ming information  into  the  Folio.  3)  Obviously,  we  do  not 
tell  programmers  what  to  name  their  programs,  any  more 
than  we  tell  them  what  they  should  air.  If  you  think  the 
name  in  the  Folio  is  bad  (I  think  it 's  rather  clever,  actually), 
consider  the  plight  of  poor  Tom  Nixon  who  has  to  live 
with  it  seven-days-a-week!  My  only  objection  to  the  title 

is  that  it  does  not  tell  subscribers  (potential  listeners)  any- 
thing about  what  the  program  is  about,  and  he  NE  VER 
submits  any  programming  information!  4)  Gay  and  Les- 
bian issues  will  continue  to  have  air  time  on  KPFK  until 
such  time  as  the  "establishment"  media  make  that  super- 
fluous by  doing  such  a  good  job  of  covering  them  tnat  they 
no  longer  need  KPFK.  KPFK  never  intended  that  all  of  our 
programs  would  interest  all  of  our  listeners.   It  is  intended 


that  minority  points  of  view  needing  a  place  on  the  air 
waves,  find  that  place  on  KPFK.  But  you  know  that.  5) 
We  wish  that  the  mere  mention  of  listener-sponsorship  be- 
tween programs  would  muster  the  support  the  station 
needs,  but  it  has  never  proved  so.  We  occasionally  re- 
member to  prepare  "carts" (cartridge  tapes)  with  brief 
pitches  for  subscribing,  but  we're  not  convinced  of  their 
effectiveness.  I  agree  with  you  that  it's  important  to  keep 
the  idea  before  the  public  all  year  'round. 
Jane  (whew!) 


Thank  you  for  the  all-gay  programming  today. 
I  am  not  often  free  to  listen  to  the  8:30  Sunday 
program  so  today's  features  were  particularly 
welcome.  Please  continue  to  give  the  gay  commun- 
ity your  support  and  through  it  a  more  positive 
image  of  itself.   I  have  phoned  in  a  contribution. 

Yours  in  Peace-         Gerry  B. 

Congratulations  Richard  Mahler,  et.  al.  for  those  two  fine 
interviews  of  Jan.  17th.  You  represent  why  our  dial  seldom 
strays  from  90.7  FM  (eat  your  heart  out,  Walter  Cronkite). 

Richard  &  Maria  Harris, 

Quail  Valley 

First  the  good  news.  I  enjoy  your  (our)  station  a  lot.  I  have 
quit  listening  to  other  stations  ekcept  our  local  AM  occa- 
sionally. I  can't  understand  why  individuals  who  would  lis- 
ten to  the  type  of  programs  on  KPFK  (and  therefore  sup- 
port the  philosophy)  would  not  be  willing  to  support  the 
station.  I  am  sure  you  can't  either.  Also  since  I  am  a  sub- 
scriber do  I  get  a  decoder  that  eliminates  the  fundraising? 
The  bad  news  is  that  I  have  NEVER  gotten  my  Folio  by 
the  first  of  the  month.  I  always  have  to  call  the  station. 

Bill  Morgan,  Corona 

The  recent  computer  problems  aside,  we  have  always  felt 
that  10  full  working  days  was  enough  time  for  the  Post 
Office  to  do  its  job,  and  have  aimed  for  that  deadline 
(approx.  the  20th  of  the  preceding  month).  Unfortunate- 
ly, too  many  of  our  subscribers  in  the  outlying  areas  share 
your  problem,  and  so  we  've  moved  our  deadline  up  again, 
leaving  the  damn  post  office  15  working  days.  If  that 
doesn  't  do  it,  we  're  all  in  trouble!  Your  own  private  decoder 
to  avoid  the  fundraising  is  simply  that  we  try  to  list  as  ac- 
curately as  possible  when  there  will  be  fundraising,  in  the 
Folio.  The  very  specifics  are  not  always  available  in  time. 
Jane 

More  letters  on  page  36. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  35 


Continued  from  page  35. 

Enclosed  is  my  cheque  for  ten  dollars,  but  don't  think  you 
get  off  so  lightly,  for  ten  dollars  I  get  my  ten  cents  worth. 
First  of  all  over  the  past  few  days  I  have  been  mulling  over 
"Pacifica  Publications."  I  don't  know  if  you  do  any  pub- 
lishing other  than  the  Folio,  but  you  do  have  some  talent 
on  your  programs  that  would  warrant  the  occasional  pam- 
phlet. For  example,  last  week  the  two  speakers  on  the  car 
show  did  an  excellent  program  on  what  to  look  for  when 
buying  a  car,  if  the  salient  points  of  that  talk  were  writ- 
ten up  into  a  pamphlet,  I    for  one  would  pay  50  to  75c 
for  the  pleasure  of  having  it  in  hand  when  searching  the 
back  alleys  of  Los  Angeles  for  a  slightly  rusty  gas  guzzler. 
Peter  Sutheim  of  In  Fidelity  could  also  do  similar  things 
to  guide  audiophiles  through  the  equipment  jungle.  Will 
Kinney  of  course  is  a  veritable  mine  of  information  for 
the  gardening  cultists,  with  four  azelias  and  a  sick  and 
sad  Ficus  Benjamins,  I  never  miss  his  programs.  There 
must  of  course  be  other  programs  that  could  generate 
similar  pamphlets. 

J.M.,  Pasadena 

But  why  not  print  such  articles  right  in  the  Folio?  When 
we  published  the  famous  Car  Show  Garage  List  two  years 
ago,  we  had  people  subscribing  to  get  their  hands  on  it! 
Obviously,  they  probably  already  felt  that  they  "should" 
subscribe,  but  the  Car  Show  list  pushed  their  buttons. 
In  this  very  Folio  is  a  long  article  about  Transition  to 
Solar  Power  written  by  the  people  that  do  a  show  on 
that  subject  on  The  Afternoon  Air.  We  are  working  on 
getting  more  of  the  same  in  future  Folios  (keep  an  eye 
out  for  the  newly  updated  Car  Show  Garage  List — 
coming  soon!)   We  want  the  Folio  to  be  as  useful  as  pos- 
sible for  our  subscribers,  because  we  want  to  keep  them 
all,  and  because  we  want  them  to  want  to  keep  us!  < 

Jane 


Dear  Anita,  Richard  and  Roberta, 

As  a  listener-subscriber  of  KPFK,  I  have  some  feedback 
on  recent  programming,  which  I  hope  will  be  welcome 
as  constructive  and  positive.    A  few  nights  back,  an  ex- 
cellent report  was  filed  by  David  Mandel  from  Jerusalem 
regarding  the  crisis  of  the  Begin  gov't,  and  recent  allega- 
tions of  brutality  against  West  Bank  Arabs.  I  think  it  is 
crucial  that  an  alternative  voice  be  heard  on  topics  NOT 
covered  by  the  Times  etc.  that  Pacifica/KPFK  new  not 
reflect  establishment  news  with  a  different  viewpoint/ 
depth,  but  choose  its  own  news  (which  I  am  sure  is  done). 
David's  report  was  an  excellent  example.  Today,  a  portion 
of  "Richland  Woman"  was  devoted  to  "Comparative  Re- 
ligion," in  this  case,  Islam.  I  have  never  heard  such  an  ob- 
noxiously biased  "explanation"  of  Islam,  in  particular 
that  of  Shi'ite  Islam.  If  the  purpose  was  to  truly  provide 
an  understanding  of  Islam,  I  see  no  place  for  Marty's  (?) 
editorial  comments  and  critque  of  religion  in  general. 
Further,  I  have  doubts  of  the  host's  full  knowledge  of 
Islam;  several  times  he  mispronounced  "Medina"  the 
next  holiest  city  in  Islam  to  Mecca  (a  superficial  criter- 
ion, but  this  is  only  indicative  of  the  overall  quality  of 
the  program).  I  am  severely  disappointed  and  welcome 
any  response.  In  peace, 

D.M.,  Los  Angeles 


The  All-Nations  Gospel  Festival  was  FANTASTIC  ("fantas- 
tic was  written  in  two-inch-high  letters,  In  five  colors.  —Ed.). 
I  would  have  written  sooner,  but  it's  taken  me  a  week  to  stop 
clapping  my  hands.  PLEASE  don't  wait  til  next  year  for  ano- 
ther gospel  festival— I  want  to  go  to  one  every  week.  This  is 
a  wonderful  way  to  have  KPFK  benefits-I'll  bring  ten  of  my 
friends  to  the  next  one.  It's  been  years  since  I  could  stand  to 
spend  more  than  an  hour  in  a  theater  or  auditorium,  but  last 
Friday  night  I  was  riveted  to  my  seat  (although  it  seemed  my 
seat  was  jumping  around!)  And  I  loved  every  second.  Sincer- 
ity, beauty,  power— every  group  was  inspired.  My  gratitude 
to  Prince  Dixon  (now  I  know  why  he's  called  the  Small  One), 
Papa  Beasley,  and  of  course  Mario.  I  wish  I  could  thank  all 
those  singers,  too.  They  were.  .  .fantastic!  Yours  for  aural 
liberation, 

K.  B.,Los  Angeles 

Next  will  be  the  Balkan  Festival,  then  in  the  spring,  we 
hope  to  have  a  Cajun  or  Carribbean  one.  We  will  have 
another  Gospel  Festival,  as  we  all  enjoyed  it  as  much  as 
you,  but  it  probably  won 't  be  quite  as  soon  as  you  would 
like.  Right  this  minute,  see  page  5  of  your  Folio  for  the 
most  immediate  benefit,  a  morning  of  women 's  films  in 
honor  of  International  Women 's  Day. 
Jane 

Charles  Morgan's  commentary  last  week  hit  our  U.S. 
Foreign  Policy  since  World  War  II  right  on  the  (ugly) 
head.  What  would  we  do  without  Charles!  ...  It  just 
occurred  to  me.  If  the  Russians  boycotted  the  Olym- 
pics in  the  70s,  we  may  have  pulled  out  of  Vietnam? 
S.M.,  Santa  Monica 


As  a  fervant  believer  in  the  idea  of  Pacifica  Radio  (I 
listened  to  KPFA  in  the  fifties)  and  a  life-long  suppor- 
ter of  KPFK,  and  also  as  a  seasoned  but  bowed  fund- 
raiser, I  feel  honor-bound  to  respond  to  your  appeal 
before  throwing  it  into  the  wastebaskct. 

Aside  from  the  fact  that  (through  my  own  fault)  I  have 
not  been  tuning  in,  I  still  continued  contributing  with 
the  idea  I  shouldn't  let  my  charter  membership  lapse. 
You  would  think,  just  once,  someone  would  bother  to 
recognize  your  old  supporters. 

Instead,  we  keep  getting  those  appeals  as  a  reminder  of 
how  many  don't  give  a  damn.   I  guess  my  main  objec- 
tion is  being  lumped  in  with  the  mass  of  people  that 
don't  give  a  damn. 

Sincerely, 

F.  B.,  No.  Hollywood 

Having  gone  through  many  and  varied  subscriptions 
systems  and  non-systems  over  the  last  20  years,  we  un- 
fortunately have  no  records  as  to  who  our  Charter  Sub- 
scribers are.    We  honor  you  all,  but  don 't  know  exactly 
who  you  are.  Sorry  to  say  good-bye.  By  the  way,  the 
mail -appeals  cut  down  on  the  on-t he-air  fundraising. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  36 


On  RETROSPECTIVE  by  L.C.  Rhinehart 

A  listener  who  became  a  subscriber  during  KPFK's  20-year  retrospectlve,wrote  (in  part):  'To  this  sick  Insomniac,  the 
RETROSPECTI VE  was  better  than  pills,  not  less  painful  but  painfully  better  even  than  injections.  No,  the  RETROSPEC 
Tl  VE  did  not  make  me  sleep;  it  kept  me  aware  while  I  was  awake— something  I  have  not  been  for  weeks. . .  .  Yes,  Mr. 
Tuckman,  the  answer  is  yes:  I  am  now  a  subscriber/sponsor/  what-have-you  (the  check  signed,  scaled,  sent;  the  doctor's 
isn  't—but  how  much  can  a  doctor  ask  of  one  sick  insomniac).  .  .  .  f  Tuckman  J  sure  scared  the  hell  out  of  this  "parasite,  " 
sent  me  running  for  the  nearest  telephone— four  blocks  to  Exxon  (and  that 's  cs  far  as  this  sick  insomniac  has  run  in  months). 
I  am  enclosing  something  I  wrote  this  last  empty  week.  It  kept  breaking  into  what  I  was  supposed  to  write,  so  I  wrote  it. 
Thought  you  might  like  to  see  it.  If  I  have  misspelled  (misheard)  names,  please  remember  that  you  are  all  sound  to  me— 
sound  and  essence. " 


Like  Gilgamesh  by  the  river, 
the  radio  has  starved  cheeks. 
Lightning  light  years  later, 
90.7  is  a  skinny,  tinny  thing 
and  the  Flower 
falls  back  into  the  sea 
— for  me. 
Eliot  fades, 
mesmerizing  Mintz, 
Voice 

of  no  age  and  no  face, 
only  sad,  saddening  space 
for  all  to  fill 
(you,  me 

dying  dachsunds); 
the  Voice  fades, 
the  chance  fades 
(chance  love,  brief  romance 
—met  on  a  casual  tape, 
parted  on  a  soft  goodby, 
with  Bogey  leaning  hard 
on  our  backdrop); 
the  Voice  fades; 
it  all  fades, 
goes  up  in  smoke 
and  out  on  schedule: 
Hodel  and  Tuckman 
(beat  magicians 
but  tough  cases, 
relentless  on  the  close-down) 
shoot  their  wrists, 
snap  their  fingers, 
press  their  buttons 
and  take  it  all  away 
—all  the  flesh  and  flash 
of  twenty  years 
and  split  seconds. 
The  steak  went  back 
(bit  or  not); 
Ustinov  finished  off 
Bach- 

— but  the  mystery  remains 
(both  remain), 
shrouded  in  white  noise: 
Who  penned 

The  Prostitute  in  a  Pique? 
and  Why  does  that 
and  all  of  that 
matter? 


It  wasn't  all  that 

massive, 

was  it? 

Not  all 

eye-blinding, 

mind-binding. 

Not  all  Watts, 

Watergate,  Viet  Nam; 

national,  international 

crises, 

cases. 

Causes; 

riots, 

routs 

and  routes 

over,  ur(der 

and  around 

the  First  Amendment, 

the  Final  Indignity. 

Massive? 

Mostly. 

Mostly 

—but  not  all 

Kent, 

Dade, 

Taxes  for  Torture, 

Mitch  tripping, 

ripping  alphabet, 

Timese  spins 

(LSD,  CIA  and  S&M). 

Mostly 

—but  not  all 

impeachment, 

assassination, 

machination: 

Me  Lai, 

Me  Lei, 

Miney, 

Mo — 

catch  bankrupt  nations 

by  what  they've  sold, 

the  covert  action, 

covering  motive, 

motion, 

slogan: 

Save  Shell/ 

Peel  a  Baby  for  Liberation. 

Massive? 

Mostly. 

Mostly 


—but  not  all. 
No,  not  Juggernauts  all 
(not  by  a  long  shot). 
It  wasn't  all  Joyce  either,  Boiyo. 
Not  all  Baldwin,  Baby. 
Not  Huxley,  Wilde, 
Cocteau,  O'Casey. 
Not  all  artists  in  hell. 
Not  all  stark,  stalking  drama: 
First,  Second,  Third 
(of  my  flimsy  fourth) 
Worlds  in  trauma 
(not  all). 
Wasn't  much- 
more  or  less— 
a  molehill? 

Jim,  dying  on  a  dark  switchboard, 
was  hardly  Morrison, 
was  he? 

David's  bout  with  the  bully-boy, 
his  scared  scurry 
for  the  watercloset 
was  hardly  Homer, 
was  it? 

Tancred  Tuckman's 
all-night  tilt 
with  the  Jazz-man 
was  hardly  cataclysmic, 
was  it? 
Was  it? 

Wasn't  much  pretty  petty, 
prosaic,  petulant; 
Malloch's  Paean  to  Malloch 
(Priest  and  Chorus  Chanting 
—Mahler  again, 
Mahler  again)? 
And  then 
there  were  those 
little  slips  of  dirty  linen 
hung  out  on  the  kilowatts, 
were  there  not? 
Little  comic  twinge  of  ego 
in  all  that  cosmic  aching. 
Little  bits  of  present  brass 
in  all  that  golden  ash  of  past: 
Anita,  Earl,  Roy- 
snipping, 
sniping, 
hyping  self, 
race. 


place, 

space 

(Tempest  in  a  C-cup: 
The  Fire  This  Time 
—and  This, 
and  This) 

while  Sandburg  tsks: 

Little  girls  and  boys, 
be  careful  what  you  say 
when  you  use  words, 
words,  words,  words; 

and  Honest  Abe  slices: 
Shit  on  Sandburg 
and  all  comfort  shittersi 

Did  anyone  mention 

the  failing 

transmitter? 

The  half-done  tape? 

The. . .  ? 

So- 

It  wasn't  all  that 

massive. 

Only  perfect. 

It  was  perfect. 

All  of  it: 

big  and  small, 

slip  and  slick, 

fabled  time 

and  foible  forming 

on  a  resident  voice; 

past  and  present, 

shaken  out  of  tense 

and  made  tension, 

perfect  tension 

—little  human  bits 

and  pieces 

balancing 

the  unbearable 

(if  the  window  doesn't  break, 

can  we  bear  the  crack  of  doom?). 

IT  WAS  PERFECT. 

And  gone. 
Too  soon. 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  37 


SJBSCRJPTJQMS 


THE  COMPUTER 

Our  computer  is  located  in  Berkeley,  which  saves  us  a 
lot  of  money  but  which  is  inconvenient.    We  send  subscrip- 
tions information  to  the  computer  twice  a  month.    Around 
the  middle  of  the  month  we  do  the  regular  Folio  label  run 
which  returns  the  Folio  labels,  bills,  renewal  letter  labels 
and  income  statements  a  few  days  later.    The  following 
week  we  do  a  "catch  up"  Folio  label  run  for  payments 
received  late  or  for  corrections  processed  after  the  regular 
run. 

Your  payment  may  not  go  into  the  computer  as 
quickly  as  you  might  think  because:  payments  go  to  our 
lockbox  at  the  Terminal  Annex  Post  Office  in  Los  Angeles, 
then  they  go  to  the  bank  and  the  bank  processes  the  pay- 
ments and  sends  them  to  us-through  the  mail.    This 
process  often  takes  more  than  a  week  from  the  time  you 
send  your  payment.    So,  if  you  send  your  check  around 
the  8th  of  the  month,  there's  a  good  chance  you  should 
receive  the  Folio  for  the  following  month  and  you'll  also 
avoid  duplicate  billing,  which  has  been  the  scourge  of  our 
subscriptions  system. 

BILL  PAYMENT 

Always  send  a  bill  with  your  check!    A  SI  5  payment 
received  without  a  bill  or  renewal  notice  might  be  credited 
as  a  Film  Club  payment,  a  straight  donation  to  the  station 
or  the  Expansion  Fund.    If  you  send  a  check  in  for  a 
pledge  payment  without  a  bill,  you  might  be  credited  for 
a  new  subscription  and  still  be  billed  for  your  original 
pledge.    Likewise,  if  you  send  a  payment  for  a  subscription 
renewal  on  a  company  check  without  a  renewal  notice, 
you're  likely  to  receive  a  new  sjbscription  at  your  com- 
pany address  and  still  receive  a  renewal  notice  for  your 
original  subscription.    So  always  be  sure  to  refer  to  your 
account  by  the  name  on  the  account  and  the  address  at 
which  you  receive  your  Folio. 

FIRST  CLASS  FOLIO  MAILING 

The  Folio  goes  out  by  2nd  Class  mail,  and  should 
take  2-5  days  to  get  most  places.  Theoretically,  2nd  Class 
gets  better  handling  than  our  old  non-profit  permit,  but 
our  experience  with  the  Post  Office  defies  theory.  First 
Class  mailing  is  available  for  38  extra  per  year  (pro-rated 
at  75  cents  per  month  for  current  subscriptions).  This  is 
often  the  answer  for  slow  mailing  areas  like  Goleta,  Santa 
Barbara,  Leucadia,  Simi  Valley  or  Pearblossom-to  name  just 
a  few.  If  you  live  in  an  area  that  gets  relatively  prompt 
service  but  want  the  Folio  well  before  the  beginning  of 
the  month,  then  you  might  want  your  Folio  by  1st  Class. 

I  DIDN'T  GET  MY  FOLIO 

The  Folio  is  mailed  around  the  20th  of  the  month.    If 
you  have  not  received  your  Folio  by  the  first  of  the  month: 
(1)  check  your  subscription  expiration  date  on  the  previous 
Folio  label  (upper  right  hand  corner  of  label).    (2)  Make 
sure  you  haven't  moved  without  notifying  us.    (3)  If  you 
haven't  moved  and  are  currently  enrolled  as  a  subscriber, 
contact  your  local  postmaster  about  delivery.    (4)  send  us 
a  previous  Folio  label  with  an  explanatory  note  or  call  for 
a  new  Folio  to  be  sent  to  you. 


MOVING-ADDRESS  CHANGES 

If  you  move,  yoLir  Folio  will  not  be  forwarded  unless 
you  request  2nd  class  forwarding  from  the  Post  Office.    The 
best  way  to  expedite  an  address  change  and  assure  continued 
receipt  of  the  Folio  is  to  call  the  station  and  ask  for  subscrip- 
tions or  leave  your  name,  old  zipcode,  and  new  address  with 
the  switchboard.    There  is  an  address  change  form  on  the 
back  page  of  the  Folio  that  can  be  used  also.    Whenever  you 
do  an  address  change  with  us,  always  include  your  account 
number  at  the  top  of  your  Folio  label-that  will  insure 
instant  handling.    Address  changes  returned  to  us  by  the 
Post  Office  cost  us  25  cents  apiece  and  frequently  take  a 
month  to  be  returned  to  us. 

PRISONER  SUBSCRIPTIONS 

KPFK  seends  free  to  any  prisoner,  upon  request,  the 
Folio. 

CASSETTE  FOLIOS  FOR  THE  PRINT  HANDICAPPED 

The  Folio  is  available  on  cassette  (returnable)  to  all 
print  handicapped  subscribers.    If  you  'vould  like  to 
receive  the  Folio  in  this  form,  please  tear  off  the  address 
label  on  the  back  of  the  Folio  and  send  it  along  with 
a  note  (or  you  may  call).    Within  two  months,  you  will 
be  receiving  your  complete  program  guide  on  cassette.    The 
cassettes  are  returned  to  us  at  the  end  of  each  month. 

EXCHANGE  MAILING  LISTS 

KPFK  exchanges  and  rents  its  subscriber  lists  to 
other  organizations  of  common  interest  (Channel  28, 
Ralph  Nader,  ACLU,  etc.).  If  you  don't  want  to  be 
on  exchange  mailing  lists,  send  your  Folio  label  to  the 
Subscriptions  Department  and  ask  for  an  "NJ"  Code. 
Your  name  will  then  be  automatically  removed  from 
all  mailings  except  for  the  Folio  and  renewal  letters. 


NEW  SUBSCRIPTION 

[    ]   $30/  year  regular  (    ]  S15/  6  months 

[    1   SI  5/ year  low  income      (    ]   $8/    6  months 

[    ]   $75/  year  Film  Club        [    1   $40  down  Film  Club, 

then  bill  $5/month.  Plus  $5  service 

GIFT  SUBSCRIPTION 

Check  subscription  type,  include  your 
name  &  address  as  well  as  recipient's 


FILM  CLUB  CONVERSION  OF  CURRENT  SUBSCRIPTION 
($15  credit  given— new  subscription  for  12  months  created) 


$60  Full  payment 


[    ]   $30  down,  bill  at  $5/mo 
(add  $S  service  charge) 


Name 


~K3dr 


City  and  zip 


MAIL  COUPONS  AND  CHECKS  TO  KPFK,  PO  BOX  542i3  TF.RMIXAL  ASNEX,  Los  Angeles,  CA  90054 

KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  38 


Natural  Foods  Started  In 
The  Valley  At  AL  KAISER'S  _ 

for  those  tcho  are 
aWMire  enough  to  core  • 

wsLTelnnvali^ 

^  RESTAURANT  -^ 

IJ62S  Ventura  Blvd..  Sherman  Oaks 

Kj^i  "I  Wuixlnian 

CocMdIa  . .  .  Olnnar  Dally  from  5  P.M. 

Lunch  Mon.  thru  FrI.  from  11:30  A.M. 

ALL  CREDIT  CARDS  HONORED 

Closed  Sunday 

Vallev:'783-5616   LA:  872-1138 


PLANT  MAINTAINANCE- 

Plant  sales.  Personal  service. 
Affordable,  hardy,  healthy  and  lush 
plants.  Courteous,  dedicated  and 
helpful  attitude.  820-2440 
Jonathan  Michals,  KPFK  subscriber. 


LESSONS  IN  JOURNALISM, 

CREATIVE  WRITING  AND 

writing  for  publication.  Judy  657-6491. 

TRANSLATION  SERVICE 

English-Spanish;  espanol -ingles 
Letters,  documents,  business  records 
Experienced,  precise— typed  results 
Not  more  than  $15  per  200  word  page 
Call  Stan  at  714/779-6481 ,  6-9  p.m. 


PROBLEM  SOLVING  GROUPS 

We  teach  and  use  cooperative  problem- 
solving  skills  in  ongoing  groups.  All- 
women's  or  mixed  groups.  Mediations 
also  available.  Reasonable  fees.  For 
more  info:  Lauren  Oliver,  399-8770. 


Classified 


ALAN  WATTS  AUDIOCASSETTES 

For  free  brochure  send  stamped 
self-addressed  envelope  to  MEA, 
Box  303,  Sau.ialito  CA  94965. 


THE  FELDENKRAIS  METHOD: 

Mind/Body  Re-Education  Experiences  for 
ALL  (helpful  for  many  phys.  disabilities). 
Awareness  through  Movement  Classes 
at  several  LA  &  Orange  Co.  locations 

and 
Functional  Integration  Private  Lessons 

by 
Trained  Members  of  the  Feldenkrais  Guild 

call: 
LA:  Bob  &  Ram  Knighton  213/799-5444 
Orange  Co:  Stella  Mariarz  714/497-1955 
S.  Monica:  Judith  Stransky  213/451-3641 


Are  you  a  friend  of 

the  ALICE  A.  BAILEY  books, 

looking  for  companions  and 

co-workerg  to  study  with? 

We  invite  you  to  join   us 

in  the  adventure— 

ARCANA  WORKSHOPS 

213/273-5949  or  540-8689 

Please  join  us  at  the  Intergroun 

FESTIVAL  OF  EASTER  (ARIES) 

Sunday,  March  30,  1980 

8:00pm 

at  741  So.  Lucerne  Blvd.,  L.A. 

(Inquire  About  Our  Wet'klv  Workshops) 


COUNSELING.  New,  low-fee  grps.  now 
forming  in  Hywd  area:  Relationship  en- 
richment grp.  for  couples;  Teachers'  grp. 
for  stressed  &  distressed;  New/recent  par- 
ents' grp.  Remy  &  Jaelline  Jaffe,  licensed 
Marriage,  Family  &  Child  Counselors  (no. 
7729,77301.213/465-6222. 


No  endorsement  is  implied  by 
KPFK  or  Pacifica  Foundation, 

YOUR  AD  WILL  BE  READ 
BY  15,000  SUBSCRIBERS. 
And  their  families  &  friends. 

Classified  rate:  $10  per  inch, 
approx.  6  lines  per  inch,  and 
40  characters  per  line,  incl. 
spaces  &  punctuation.  (A 
line  of  all-capitals=  25  char.) 

DEADLINE:  1st  of  month 
PRECEDING  the  month  of 
publication.  STRICT!;! 

PAYIV1ENTIN  ADVANCE. 
\Vc  cannot  afford  to  bill  you. 


ALL  ADS  MUST  BE 
PAID  IN  ADVANCE. 
We  can't  afford  to  do 
billing  and  follow-up] 


BLUEGRASS  &  FOLK  MUSIC,  TOO,  IS 
ALIVE  IN  ORANGE  CO.  THINK  SHADE 
TREE  STRINGED  INSTRUMENTS: 

quality  acouscic  instruments  exclusively. 
Student  &  professional  instruments;  re- 
cords; instruction  books;  lessons  on  5- 
string  banjo,  folk  &  classical  guitar,  man- 
dolin, Dobro  &  dulcimer.  Repair  &  resto- 
ration. SHADE  TREE  STRINGED  IN- 
STRUMENTS, 28722  Marguerite  Pkwy., 
Mission  Viejo.  714/495-5270.  (2  biks  so. 
of  the  Mission  Viejo  Mall,  in  rear  of  bidg.) 


PLAY  THE  RECORDER 

with  experienced  and  supportive  teacher. 


13 


B^ 


Wilshire/Fairfax  area  studio.  213/935-6072 


moving? 

The  Folio  will  NOT  be  automatically 
forwarded  to  your  new  address.    It 
will  be  returned  to, us  after  a  few 
weeks  with  your  new  address  on  it- 
probably  not  in  time  for  the  next 
Folio.    So  to  avoid  missing  out,  fill 
out  this  coupon  and  return  it  to  Sub- 
scriptions.   Be  sure  your  label  is  on 
the  back.    (We  get  500-1000  address 
changes  a  month).    Thankyou. 


PLEASE  PRINT!!!!! 


NAME 


NEW  ADDRESS 


CITY  STATE  /IP 

Mail  to:  Subscriptions  Dept.,  KPFK,  3729  Cahuenga  Blvd.  West,  No.  H 


KPFK  FOLIO  PAGE  39 


CONTEMPORARY    MUSIC 


CONTEMPORARY  MUSIC  FESTIVAL  1980 


PRESENTED  BY 


THE  SCHOOL  OF  MUSIC,  CALIFORNIA  INSTITUTE  OF  THE  ARTS 


THE  DEPARTMENT  OF  MUSIC,  UNIVERSITY  OF  CALIFORNIA,  SAN  DIEGO 


THE  DEPARTMENT  OF  MUSIC,  UNIVERSITY  OF  NEVADA.LAS  VEGAS 


TUESDAY,  MARCH  4,  8:00  P.M. 

PAULINE  OLIVEROS/GORDON  MUMMA/BEATRICE  MANLEY  "Fwyynghn:  A  Stage  Piece 
with  Music  and  a  Ballet  Dance" 

WEDNESDAY,  MARCH  5 

Composers  Panel.  12:00  noon.  Seminar  Composers  Concert.  8:00  p.m. 

THURSDAY,  MARCH  6 

Critics  Panel,  1 2:00  noon.  DAVID  TUDOR  with  Seminar  Members,  8:00  p.m.  "Forest  Speech:  A 
Live  Electronic  Environment" 

FRIDAY,  MARCH  7,  8:00  P.M. 

McNABB  'Dance  of  Shiva";  [THE]  "Piece  for  Tape  and  Dancer";  MARTIRANO  "L's  GA.  for 
Gassed-Masked  Politico.  Helium  Bomb,  projectors  and  tape";  EMSHWILLER/REYNOLDS 
"Eclipse";  for  video  tapes.  7  -  channel  sound  system. computer  synthesized  materials  and 
computer  and  analog  processed  voices" 

SATURDAY,  MARCH  8,  4:00  P.M. 

SCHOENBERG  String  Quartet  No  2;  POWELL  "Little  Companion  Pieces";WUORINEN  Second 
String  Quartet:  KONDO.  "Summer  Nights".  MOSKO  "Cosmology  of  Easy  Listening";  VIGELAND 
"Vara";  SPECIAL  EVENT.  SUBOTNICK  "Game  Room"  (repeated  Sunday) 

SATURDAY,  8:00  P.M. 

ERICKSON  "Night  Music";  DRUCKMAN  "AP'mus  IV";  KRAFT  'The  Sublime  and  the  Beautiful"; 
KRENEK  "Fi'jtp  Pi-;e  in  Nine  Phases";  RAi>">S  "Metalepsis  2" 

SUNDAY,  MARCH  9,  4:00  P.M. 

FOSS  "13  Ways  of  Looking  at  a  Blackbird";  BROWN  "Calder  Piece";  TAKEMITSU  "Stanza" 

SUNDAY,  7:00  P.M. 

ROSENMAN  "Chamber  Music  V";  BALEY  "Lamentation  of  Adrian  Leverkuehn";  SHAPEY 
"Concerto  for  Clarinet  and  Chamber  Group";  SUBOTNICK  "After  the  Butterfly" 

NOTES  All  events  at  California  Institute  of  the  Arts,  24700  McBean  Parkway,  Valencia,  CA.  are 
free  and  SUBJECT  TO  CHANGE. 


MARCH  4-9        CALIFORNIA  INSTITUTE  OF  THE  ARTS 
24700  McBEAN  PKWY.  VALENCIA,  CA.  (213)  362-2315     (805)  255-1057 


a  TfcT 


service.  ^Q 

the  monttrr 

~K   90.7  FM 

I  DIDNT  GEVjhuenga  Blvd.  West 
TheFolioi-.^^   ^^^^^,^ 

you  have  not  receive' 

(1 )  check  your  subsc, 

Folio  label  (upper  rig« 

sure  you  haven't  movi| 

haven't  moved  and  are' 

contact  your  local  pos 

a  previous  Folio  label  \ 

a  new  Folio  to  be  sent 


Application  to  mall  at  Second  Class 
rates  is  pending  at  North  Hollywood 
Ca.  and  Additional  mailing  offices. 


MAIL  COUPONS